Don't Call Me Son, Anna Muylaert's acclaimed Brazilian film about an adopted crossdressing teen who finds his birthparents, is at the Roxie. (Courtesy photo)

Films opening Nov. 18, 2016

Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk: Director Ang Lee has adapted Ben Fountain’s novel about a platoon of Iraq War soldiers honored during a football game in Dallas in 2004, in 3D format with 4K resolution at 120 frames per second (five times higher than an ordinary movie). Rated R.

Bleed for This: Miles Teller stars as Vinny “The Pazmanian Devil” Pazienza, a boxer who suffered a death-defying car accident that severed his spine, only to battle back and reclaim his world title with the help of trainer Kevin Rooney. Rated R.

Don’t Call Me Son: The acclaimed Brazilian film by Anna Muylaert is about a cross-dressing teenage boy who finds out he was stolen at birth, and is then forced to move in with his wealthy biological parents. Not rated. At the Roxie.

The Edge of Seventeen: Adolescence gets worse for a teenage girl when her impossibly perfect older brother starts dating her best friend in the film starring Hailee Steinfeld and written and directed by Kelly Fremon Craig. Rated R.

Elle: Isabelle Huppert plays the ruthless head of a video game company who is attacked in her home and drawn into a different type of game; the film, in French with English subtitles, is based on the novel “Oh …” by Philippe Djian and directed by Paul Verhoeven. Rated R. At the Embarcadero.

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them: In a Harry Potter spin-off written by J.K. Rowling, Eddie Redmayne stars as “magizoologist” Newt Scamander, whose misadventures in New York City include the escape of recently collected creatures. Rated PG-13.

National Bird: The documentary by investigative journalist/filmmaker Sonia Kennebeck is about three U.S. military veterans who blow the whistle on America’s secret drone war in which attacks are carried out remotely in foreign countries. Not rated. At the Roxie.

Nocturnal Animals: Amy Adams and Jake Gyllenhaal star as a divorced couple whose relationship takes a dark turn after he writes a novel in the movie written and directed by Tom Ford, based on the novel “Tony and Susan” by Austin Wright. Rated R. At the Century San Francisco Centre.

A Street Cat Named Bob: A down-and-out Londoner turns his life around after he nurses a wily tom cat back to health in the film based on a book by James Bowen. Not rated. At the Opera Plaza. Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime WalkBleed for ThisDon't Call Me SonEdge of SeventeenElleFantastic BeastsFilms opening Nov. 18Movies and TVNational BirdNocturnal AnimalsStreet Cat Named Bob

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