Critics are calling "Lucky," starring the late Harry Dean Stanton, an homage to the late great character actor. (Courtesy Magnolia Pictures)

Critics are calling "Lucky," starring the late Harry Dean Stanton, an homage to the late great character actor. (Courtesy Magnolia Pictures)

Films opening Friday, Oct. 6, 2017

Blade Runner 2049: Ryan Gosling stars as an officer searching for Harrison Ford’s Deckard, 30 years after the events of the first film based on characters from a novel by Philip K. Dick. Rated R.

Chavela: The documentary by Catherine Gund and Daresha Kyi (in Spanish with English subtitles) goes inside the life of Ranchera singer Chavela Vargas, a sexual and gender rebel in the 1950s. Not rated. At the Opera Plaza.

Loving Vincent: The world’s first fully oil painted feature film — a uniquely animated film composed of 65,000 painted frames — brings to vibrant life the artwork of complicated and controversial artist Vincent van Gogh. Rated PG-13. At the Clay.

Lucky: Harry Dean Stanton plays a 90-year-old man thrust into a journey of self-exploration and the search for enlightenment in the directorial debut of character actor John Carroll Lynch. Not rated. At the Embarcadero.

The Mountain Between Us:
A journalist and a doctor stranded on a snowy mountaintop after a plane crash must rely on another to survive in the film starring Kate Winslet and Idris Elba based on the novel by Charles Martin. Rated PG-13.

My Little Pony: The beloved equine toys go on a journey to save Ponyville in the animated feature (based on the TV series) with voices by Uzo Aduba, Emily Blunt, Kristin Chenoweth, Taye Diggs, Michel Pena, Zoe Saldana, Liev Schreiber and Sia. Rated PG.Blade Runner 2046ChavelaLoving VincentLuckyMountain Between UsMovies and TVMy Little Pony

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