Film festival bolsters new Hispanic arts group

The new San Francisco Latino Film Festival — featuring 22 films from the U.S., Latin America, Spain and Portugal — also heralds the debut of its parent organization, CineMas, which offers year-round programming in visual, performing and literary arts. The Examiner spoke with CineMas founder Lucho Ramirez, who’s also director of the 10-person volunteer collective.

Why do we need another Hispanic arts organization? I want to go beyond identity politics. There’s nothing wrong with that, but I’d like a wider scope, including international films, operating outside the conventional. We’re working with Mission Cultural Center, Galeria de la Raza, as well as La Peña in Berkeley. There are so many communities — it’s socioeconomic in part — that one size doesn’t fit all.

Why a film festival as central, CineMas being a pun on “cinema and more”? CineAccion is dormant now, and the Latino Film Society [aka the S.F. International Latino Film Fest], folded earlier this year. I thought it was wrong, when there is support from the community and sponsorship, to close the film festival down. I thought something like this had to continue and broaden. 

What made “Spoken Word” the choice for opening night? It seemed a “complete” film in the sense of being a product of both U.S. and Latin American Latinos: It has Latino actors, one of the screenwriters is Latino from New Mexico, the director is Peruvian-American and it’s set in the Bay Area and Mexico.

What’s the most controversial film in your lineup? Maybe “Hermaphrodite,” which we’re co-presenting with Frameline, the fictional story of a person born intersex. The film itself is not necessarily shocking, but I think the term as the title — and being set in the rural Dominican Republic — that’s controversial to some. After we mentioned it on a radio program recently, callers left the host some hostile voice mail.

What documentary in the festival was the most revelatory for you? “Forgotten Injustice,” about Mexicans [including legal immigrants] and Mexican-Americans that were deported in the ’30s — xenophobia and scapegoating in the Great Depression.
 

IF YOU GO

San Francisco Latino Film Festival

Where: Clay Theatre, 2261 Fillmore St.; Mission Cultural Center, 2868 Mission St.; Lumiere Theatre, 1572 California St.; all in San Francisco 
When: Today though Nov. 25
Tickets: $8 to $10
Contact: (415) 826-7057, www.sflatinofilmfestival.com

artsCineMasentertainmentMoviesSan Francisco Latino Film Festival

Just Posted

A collaborative workspace for a decentralized autonomous organization (DAO) in Coordinape is pictured at a recent blockchain meet up at Atlas Cafe. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Business without bosses: San Francisco innovators battle bureaucracy with blockchain

‘The next generation will work for three DAOs at the same time’

Plan Bay Area 2050 is an expansive plan guiding the region’s growth and development over the next three decades. The regional plan addresses progressive policy priorities like a universal basic income and a region-wide rent cap, alongside massive new spending on affordable housing and transportation infrastructure. (Shutterstock)
Plan Bay Area 2050: Analyzing an extensive regional plan that covers the next 30 years

Here are the big ticket proposals in the $1.4 trillion proposal

Pregnant women are in the high-risk category currently prioritized for booster shots in San Francisco. (Unai Huizi/Shutterstock)
What pregnant women need to know about COVID and booster shots

Inoculations for immunosuppressed individuals are recommended in the second trimester

Examiner reporter Ben Schneider drives an Arcimoto Fun Utility Vehicle along Beach Street in Fisherman’s Wharf on Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Could San Francisco’s tiny tourist cruisers become the cars of the future?

‘Fun Utility Vehicles’ have arrived in The City

Most Read