Film director James Cameron backs out of debate with global warming skeptics, calls them ’swine’

Filmmaker James Cameron challenged three global warming skeptics to a debate that was to be held at an environmental event in Colorado this past weekend. Representatives for Cameron contacted Ann McElhinney, the filmmaker behind the documentary Not Evil Just Wrong, Marc Morano of the Climate Depot website and new media guru Andrew Breitbart to participate. Then, according to McElhinney, Cameron started waffling:

But then as the debate approached James Cameron’s side started changing the rules.

They wanted to change their team. We agreed.

They wanted to change the format to less of a debate—to “a roundtable”. We agreed.

Then they wanted to ban our cameras from the debate. We could have access to their footage. We agreed.

Bizarrely, for a brief while, the worlds most successful film maker suggested that no cameras should be allowed-that sound only should be recorded. We agreed

Then finally James Cameron, who so publicly announced that he “wanted to call those deniers out into the street at high noon and shoot it out,” decided to ban the media from the shoot out.

He even wanted to ban the public. The debate/roundtable would only be open to those who attended the conference.

No media would be allowed and there would be no streaming on the internet.  No one would be allowed to record it in any way.

We all agreed to that.

And then, yesterday, just one day before the debate, his representatives sent an email that Mr. “shoot it out ” Cameron no longer wanted to take part. The debate was cancelled.

After shutting McElhinney, Morano and Breitbart out of the conference, the Aspen Times reported Cameron had choice words at the event for his would-be debate partners. “I think they’re swine,” he said.

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