Fillmore jazz icon Frank Jackson goes back to his roots

Pianist-vocalist Frank Jackson, who has lived in The City since 1942, is the first resident jazz musician invited to perform at the new Yoshi’s on Fillmore.

The local luminary will appear Monday with trumpeter Allen Smith, bassist Al Obidinski, drummer Omar Clay and multi-reed player Noel Jewkes.

Jacksonstarted his career in the 1940s in San Francisco’s Fillmore Jazz District, working at Jimbo’s Bop City. Through the years, he’s played with Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Ben Webster, Charlie “Bird” Parker, John Coltrane, Frank Foster, Dexter Gordon, Lionel Hampton, Chet Baker and Ruth Brown.

In 2005, he was honored as a Heritage Pioneer Jazz Legend of the Fillmore District at The City’s official groundbreaking ceremonies for the new complex.

Recently, he composed music for KQED’s “The War: Bay Area Stories,” a documentary about how the Bay Area was affected by World War II.

Jackson and his band play at 8 and 10 p.m. Monday; Yoshi’s is at 1330 Fillmore St., San Francisco. Tickets are $16 to $20. Call (415) 655-5600 or visit www.yoshis.com.

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