Justyne Fischer’s “Suspicious Suicide” is a woodcut piece questioning the death of an unarmed black woman who was in police custody in Texas. (Courtesy Justyne Fischer)

Justyne Fischer’s “Suspicious Suicide” is a woodcut piece questioning the death of an unarmed black woman who was in police custody in Texas. (Courtesy Justyne Fischer)

Feminists’ fury rises in ‘F213’

Group show offers works by angry artists calling for change

In tune with the soaring numbers of women who are fervently calling for change, a new exhibition, “F213,” boldly addresses, through feminist art, problems ranging from domestic violence to anti-immigrant cruelty to environmental degradation.

On view through May 11 at the Arc Gallery in San Francisco and presented by the Northern California Women’s Caucus for Art, the exhibit contains pointed and passionate works by 41 local and national artists, collectively delivering a roar of feminist, Trump-era protest.

Organizers have paired each artwork with text composed by a writer expressing additional insight and outrage.

“F213” means 213 degrees Fahrenheit, or a state of having exceeded the boiling point.

Featured artists include Nancy Hom, who created “No More Violence Against Asians” in 1996 as a response to physical attacks Asians had been experiencing. The silkscreen work, an image of violence and outrage, is relevant today, says Hom in her artist statement, noting that anti-Asian violence has recently increased.

Justyne Fischer depicts police-related deaths of unarmed black people in her woodblock art. In “Suspicious Suicide” (2017), she considers possible scenarios surrounding the case of Sandra Bland, who died in police custody in Hempstead, Texas, after a traffic stop.

Kelly Hammargren’s “Democracy Flew Away While I Lie Sleeping” (2018) addresses how citizen ignorance and apathy contribute to disastrous election results. The mixed-media piece contains doll-like figures, flags, voter statistics and phraseology like “Crooked Hillary.”

Amy Ahlstrom, who makes quilts inspired by street art and pop art, looks at the invisibility of women in “Feminists Talk (Amy)” (2017), a double portrait. One image reveals how its subject sees herself;

the other shows how society sees her.

Kadie Salfi draws attention to gun violence, and the killing of women by romantic partners, in “My Mom and Scorpio” (2018), a work created with graphite, spray paint and cosmetics.

Containing barbed wire, wood and an image of a U.S. flag, Judy Shintani’s “Pledge Allegiance” (2014) remembers the wartime incarceration of Japanese Americans. The wood came from the former Tule Lake concentration camp. Shintani’s artist statement suggests that similar discrimination, against Muslims, Mexicans and other groups, exists today.

Environmental works include Jennifer Kim Sohn’s “Toxic Habits” (2010), whose subject is monocrop farming. The artist has filled soda bottles, laboratory-specimen style, with cotton frogs that resemble actual deformed frogs found near industrial cornfields.

Additional works include Favianna Rodriguez’s immigrant-themed poster “Undocumented Unafraid” (2010); Lenore Chinn’s San Francisco Pride-related “Rise Resist Unite” (2017), a modern archival print; photographer Della Calfee’s “Intimidation” (2013), picturing bullying protesters at a family-planning clinic; and Indira Cesarine’s “Equal Means Equal” (2018), a pink neon sculpture.

Featured writers include Sandra Cisneros, Petra Kuppers, Janice Mirikitani, Peggy Phelan and Nellie Wong.

IF YOU GO

F213

Where: Arc Gallery, 1246 Folsom St., S.F.

When: 1 to 6 p.m. Wednesdays-Thursdays, noon to 3 p.m. Saturdays; by appointment; closes May 11

Admission: Free

Contact: www.ncwca.org

Visual Arts

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“Feminists Talk (Amy)” is quilt artist Amy Ahlstrom’s double self-portrait comparing how she sees herself to how society sees her. (Courtesy Amy Ahlstrom)

“Feminists Talk (Amy)” is quilt artist Amy Ahlstrom’s double self-portrait comparing how she sees herself to how society sees her. (Courtesy Amy Ahlstrom)

“Pledge Allegiance” by Judy Shintani, a flag made from wood from a dilapidated barrack, references her Japanese-American father’s incarceration in a work camp during World War II. (Courtesy Judy Shintani)

“Pledge Allegiance” by Judy Shintani, a flag made from wood from a dilapidated barrack, references her Japanese-American father’s incarceration in a work camp during World War II. (Courtesy Judy Shintani)

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