Everyone wins in one artist’s lottery

The odds of hitting the jackpot in Powerball are 1 in 120,526,770. That figure never changes, no matter how many people play. A scratch lottery ticket yields better odds, with most games returning at least 50 percent of the total prize money available to players.

Yet everyone is a winner in artist Packard Jennings’ lottery, which offers prizes that go much deeper than your wallet.

With a work simply called “Lottery Tickets,” the Oakland-based artist, known for taking capitalism and corporate conglomerates to task, does so once again. In his new experiential piece, Jennings turns his attention to the community-building aspect of art, using the familiar lottery ticket as the medium for his tongue-in-cheek message.

“I think [the lottery] has this really interesting function … I think it’s the last justification for the American dream,” Jennings says.

Jennings created four styles of scratch lottery tickets, each one designated for a specific neighborhood, each one spoofing real tickets’ oft-gaudy aesthetic, and each offering a “prize” pertaining to the community where the ticket is distributed.

The project began Nov. 24 at U&I Liquor on Telegraph Avenue in Oakland, with store owners passing out the first batch of tickets titled “Bling, Bling Cha-Ching.”

Thanasi’s Market in San Francisco’s Mission district began passing out “Fantasmas de Oro,” shouting out to its customers “Ransack Ruins!” On Wednesday, a third store will distribute tickets titled “Unicorns, Fairies, Santas and Bigfoot” near Oakland’s Lake Merritt. The fourth and final batch of tickets, called “Billionaire Bootstraps,” will be distributed beginning Jan. 20 from a market in San Francisco’s Western Addition.

Altogether, 12,000 tickets have been printed and distributed to stores in the project, which is supported by Southern Exposure, a San Francisco arts organization.

Store owners either hand out Jennings’ “scratchers” with other purchased scratchers, or to anyone who requests one. Laminated cards describing the project in detail hang inside each store.

Some “prizes” are stories or drawings culled from interviews the artist conducted in neighborhoods where the tickets are being distributed. Jennings said he approached “everyone and anyone” whom he came across in order to get a complete picture and representation of how people view their neighborhoods.

People who receive the tickets are invited to share their experience on a blog on Jennings’ Web site, www.centennialsociety.com/lottery.htm.

Jennings has no plans to collect the tickets and do anything further with them beyond the experiential, though he is considering initiating the project in a different city.

“The moment of art happens at the liquor store, when they scratch these tickets,” Jennings says.

Art & Museumsartsentertainment

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Recology executives have acknowledged overcharging city ratepayers. (Mira Laing/2017 Special to S.F. Examiner)
Recology to repay customers $95M in overcharged garbage fees, city attorney says

San Francisco’s waste management company, Recology, has agreed to repay its customers… Continue reading

A construction worker watches a load for a crane operator at the site of the future Chinatown Muni station for the Central Subway on Tuesday, March 3, 2021. (Sebastian Miño-Bucheli / Special to the S.F. Examiner)
Major construction on Central Subway to end by March 31

SFMTA board approves renegotiated contract with new deadline, more contractor payments

(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Settlement clears path for all youth, high school sports to resume in California

John Maffei The San Diego Union-Tribune All youth and high school sports… Continue reading

State to reserve 40 percent of COVID-19 vaccines for hard-hit areas

By Eli Walsh Bay City News Foundation State officials said Thursday that… Continue reading

Neighbors and environmental advocates have found the Ferris wheel in Golden Gate Park noisy and inappropriate for its natural setting. <ins>(</ins>
Golden Gate Park wheel wins extension, but for how long?

Supervisors move to limit contract under City Charter provision requiring two-thirds approval

Most Read