Eisley guitarist sings through the pain

Sherri DuPree — the guitarist for Eisley, the ethereal alt-pop family band from tiny Tyler, Texas — now signs her autograph with an added surname: Bemis, for new husband Max Bemis of the punk outfit Say Anything. But do not expect the band’s upcoming third effort on Equal Vision Records to be awash with wedded bliss. For seven painful months in 2007, DuPree was married to New Found Glory’s Chad Gilbert, and their breakup and eventual divorce is documented in every last groove. With kid sis Christie DuPree opening, Eisley plays The City tonight.

You have been married to Max for more than a year. How is it going? It’s amazing; it couldn’t be better. I’ve been in heaven, and he’s just incredible.

And you have set up house in Tyler? Yeah. When we first started dating, Max came down to visit me in Tyler. And I told him, “With my family, it’s a commitment. If you want to be with me, you kind of have to be with them, because we’re all very close, we’re best friends, and we’re in a band together, obviously.” So he said, “Well, to show you how much that I care about you, I’m just going to move down there now, so we can spend a lot of time together and really get to know each other.” So he came down, bought a house, and that’s where we moved after we were married.

Do you write songs together? Well, Max will sit anywhere and just sing as loud as he can on the guitar until he works a song out. But I tend to hide and not let anyone hear what I’m working on until I have it at a place where it’s presentable. So we’ve started to collaborate a little bit. But we want to write a whole record together, and do it as a whole project and make it really good, not just something we do on our computers.

What went wrong with your first marriage, in your opinion? I don’t know. But our whole next record is kind of about that relationship, just because I was so blindsided by it and I didn’t see it coming. It was really rough — I’m not going to lie. But thankfully my family really got me through that. [Chad] moved down, got a house too, and I really thought that I was going to be with him the rest of my life. But all of a sudden he said, “No. I’m done. I’m going.”

Will we hear the new tearjerkers in concert? There’s one called “Sad” that’s about the divorce and this other woman that came into the relationship. It’s hard to sing, but I love it.

IF YOU GO

Eisley

Where: Swedish American Hall, Cafe Du Nord, 2170 Market St., San Francisco

When: 8 p.m. today

Tickets: $15

Contact: (415) 861-5016, www.ticketweb.com

artsEisleyentertainmentmusicPop Music & Jazz

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