Dhani Harrison, George Harrison’s son, is on tour with the new album “IN///PARALLEL.” (Courtesy Josh Giroux)

Dhani Harrison, George Harrison’s son, is on tour with the new album “IN///PARALLEL.” (Courtesy Josh Giroux)

Dhani Harrison took his time to go solo

Dhani Harrison, son of late Beatle George Harrison, has never shied away from joining major stars such as Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, Tom Petty, Jeff Lynne, Steve Winwood, Prince and Eddie Vedder on guitar at major concerts and award ceremonies.

“I was dropped in at the deep end,” Harrison, 39, says. “But I grew up playing with a lot of these people, so I never had problems playing live.”

But only recently — after releasing three albums and two EPs with the under-the-radar band, thenewno2 and composing film and TV scores (“Beautiful Creatures,” “Learning to Drive,” “Good Girls Revolt”) with Grammy-winning Abbey Road Studios sound engineer Paul Hicks — did he feel comfortable striking out on his own with his first solo effort, 2017’s “IN///PARALLEL.”

He comes to The City on Wednesday on his first solo tour to promote the cinematic LP, which melds electronic music, trip hop and Middle Eastern strings.

“I’d been working on this record, and it was a deep, personal story,” he says. “It didn’t fit with my friends that I typically collaborate with, so that became a solo journey.”

Much of the album’s dystopian subject matter — fake news in “#WarOnFalse,” police brutality in “Summertime Police,” cloud seeding in “Poseidon” (Keep Me Safe)” and Fomo in “All About Waiting” — was made clear to him after returning to regular meditation two years
ago.

“There are periods in your life where you sleep, and then you wake up again and just go ‘wow.’ I made the effort of meditating every day and every evening, and I’d spent a lot of time by myself in nature and getting really in tune. You start to elevate your frequency, so I opened my eyes in a greater way to all this other stuff in the world that I couldn’t see before. That became the basis of the story of this whole record,” he says.

While Harrison is eager to forge ahead with his solo career, he says he’ll always make time to perform with his musical idols: “Even now I have to pinch myself sometimes, because I’ve had such a fortunate life to play with these people, I must have been born with the right karma that, for some reason, I just fit into these people’s bands, and now it’s kind of a thing that I’m the guy that’s there to stand in. But I feel like I’ve got no ceiling now, like I can go much further than I used to. I feel like I’ve unlocked a whole new part of myself, so I look forward to making more music
now.”

IF YOU GO
Dhani Harrison
Where: Chapel, 777 Valencia St., S.F.
When: 8 p.m. Wednesday Nov. 22
Tickets: $20
Contact: www.thechapelsf.com

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