Defense challenges memory of witness in alleged assault of Yale singers

Police inspectors testified Tuesday in the case of two men accused of assaulting a group of Yale University singers that the scene on that New Year’s was a drunken brawl involving several people.

Richard Aicardi and Brian Dwyer, both now 20, have been charged with felony counts of assault and battery for an alleged attack on two members of the a cappella group the Baker’s Dozen, Evan Gogel and William Bailey.

The preliminary hearing continued Tuesday with testimony from police inspectors in the case, who described a fight involving several drunken people that began with a confrontation inside the Richmond district party early in the morning of Jan. 1, 2007.

Also on Tuesday, Bryan Bibler, who testified Monday, was cross-examined by the defense. Bibler testified Monday that he saw one of the defendants, Richard Aicardi, punch a fellow group member in the face.

But the defense questioned Bibler’s memory of the event, presenting a police report taken after the attack in which Bibler makes no identification of Aicardi.

An identification in a police photo lineup including the second defendant, Brian Dwyer, was also questioned after Bibler circled and then crossed out Dwyer’s picture.

Bibler defended himself by saying that taking the stand Monday had renewed the memory of certain events that night, such as seeing Aicardi punch Sharyar Aziz Jr., a Baker’s Dozen member who sustained the worst injuries, including a broken jaw.

Both Aicardi and Dwyer are out of custody. The preliminary hearing, after which a judge will determine if there is enough evidence for a trial, is scheduled to continue today at 10:30 a.m. 

Bay City News contributed to this report.

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