Courtesy photoRock show: Deerhoof

Courtesy photoRock show: Deerhoof

Deerhoof plays Slim’s in San Francisco

Who’s in town

Alternative-rock and noir-pop singer-songwriter Nicole Atkins performs at Café Du Nord. [7:30 p.m., 2170 Market St., S.F.]

Lectures

Joel Fajans: The UC Berkeley physics professor gives a talk titled “Antimatter, Anti-Atoms and the Big Bang.” [6 p.m., Commonwealth Club, 595 Market St., S.F.]

Banned Books Week:
Mickey Huff of Project Censored discusses the role of the news media in modern censorship and reviews the most censored news stories of the year. [7:30 p.m., Booksmith, 1644 Haight St., S.F.]

Literary events

Lynn Povich: The journalist discusses “The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued Their Bosses and Changed the Workplace.” [7 p.m., Books Inc., 74 Town and Country Village, Palo Alto]

Tori Hogan: The filmmaker and aid worker discusses “Beyond Good Intentions: A Journey Into the Realities of International Aid.” [7 p.m., Books Inc., 601 Van Ness Ave., S.F.]

Poetry night: Poets Rebecca Farivar and Ben Mirov read from their work. An open-mic session, hosted by Jerry Ferraz, follows. [7 p.m., Bird and Beckett Books and Records, 653 Chenery St., S.F.]

Book discussion: Eric Hoffer’s “The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements” is the topic. [5:30 p.m., Commonwealth Club, 595 Market St., S.F.]

At the colleges

Ziba Mir-Hosseini: The London-based professor gives a talk titled “Love, Rights and Honor: Gender and Democracy in Iran.” [6:30 p.m., Lane History Corner, Building 200, Room 303, Stanford University, Stanford]

Film screening:
“I Am Cuba,” directed by communist filmmaker Mikhail Kalatozov in 1964 and rereleased in the 1990s by Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese, screens at the San Francisco Art Institute. [7:30 p.m., 800 Chestnut St., S.F.]

At the public library

Gene Yang: The graphic-novel creator (“American Born Chinese,” “Level Up”) demystifies the workings behind this increasingly popular narrative art form. [7 p.m., Sunset Branch, 1305 18th Ave., S.F.]

‘First Monday Movies’: “A Free Soul” (1930), directed by Clarence Brown and starring Norma Shearer, Lionel Barrymore and Clark Gable, screens. [6:30 p.m., Excelsior Branch, 4400 Mission St., S.F.]

Local activities

Rock show: Deerhoof, which began as an obscure San Francisco noise act, and is now an influential indie band, plays. [8 p.m., Slim’s, 333 11th St., S.F.]

Indie rock: The indie-rock band Grouplove performs at the Fillmore. “Never Trust a Happy Song” is its debut album. [8 p.m., 1805 Geary Blvd., S.F.]

Theatrical reading: Dramatists Guild San Francisco Footlights Series presents a free staged reading of “Like Poetry,” a play by Kristian O’Hare. [7 p.m., SF Playhouse Stage 2, 533 Sutter St., S.F.]

Vibes and visuals: The Left Coast Chamber Ensemble presents “Portraits in Sound,” a concert exploring the interplay of music and visual arts. [8 p.m., S.F. Conservatory of Music, 50 Oak St., S.F.]

Dining out

Cafe de la Presse: The tarte provencale — crispy flatbread with tomatoes, basil, pesto, nicoise olives and Parmesan cheese — is recommended. Also try the homemade confit of mulard duck leg. [352 Grant Ave., S.F.; (415) 398-2680]

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