Dede Wilsey (pictured at the San Francisco Opera ball in 2010 with John Traina) will step down from Fine Arts Museums’ board of trustees’ presidency. (Drew Altizer/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Dede Wilsey (pictured at the San Francisco Opera ball in 2010 with John Traina) will step down from Fine Arts Museums’ board of trustees’ presidency. (Drew Altizer/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Dede Wilsey to leave Fine Arts Museums presidency

Board member Jason Moment expected to take post in wake of long controversy

Dede Wilsey is expected to step down from the presidency of the board of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

The philanthropist and longtime head of the organization that oversees the de Young Museum and Legion of Honor will be replaced by Jason Moment, a San Francisco money manager with Route One Investment Company and member of the Fine Arts Museums’ Board of Trustees since 2014, according to a statement released by the Fine Arts Museums today.

Wilsey, whose long tenure with the organization has been marked by controversy, including accusations of financial misdealings in 2016 and resignations of board members and staffers not pleased with her authoritarian style, is expected to be named chair emerita by the board today.

Moment, who has served on the board’s executive committee since 2017, will succeed Wilsey as president of the public FAMSF board as well as chair of the board of the private Corporation of the Fine Arts Museums (COFAM), the second of three FAMSF governing bodies, which raises funds for and manages most of the day-to-day operations of the museums. (The third is the private Fine Arts Museums Foundation.)

Wilsey, who said she intends to dedicate more time to her family upon her departure, has headed up FAMSF since 1998.Museums and GalleriesVisual Arts

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