Davy Jones is still a believer

There was a time — actually not that long ago — when teen idols boasted class and style. They were looked up to, not just consumed as some kind of meal on the mass entertainment menu like many of them are today, which makes somebody like Davy Jones a particularly interesting creature.

The former teen dream of the 1960s was, well, interesting — and, by his own admission, “interested” in what was really going on around him.

That will be evident when Jones hits the Rrazz Room for a three-night gig later this week in a show he calls very “up close and personal.”

“These days, you have to be in the tabloids to ‘get noticed,’” he says of the changing times, “but I’m am still ‘new’ to some audiences.”

And cherished by others who already know of him.

Having shot to fame as the fourth creative peg of the super group/TV sensation The Monkees —  which also included Mickey Dolenz, Peter Tork and Michael Nesmith — more than four decades ago, Jones and the rest generated major buzz with hits such as “Daydream Believer,” “I’m a Believer” and “Last Train to Clarksville.”

Concert tours fueled the group’s celebrity, but Manchester-born Jones stood out on stage, as well as with his own projects, and also in other television appearances. (TV’s Marcia Brady gushed that she’d never wash the cheek Jones kissed in his appearance on “The Brady Bunch.”)

These days, Jones’ life is still festive. Now in his 60s, he’s the grandfather of three and still somewhat of a honeymooner after remarrying last year. He still performs across the country, often connecting with music groups such as The Turtles, The Association and others, who were part of the “good times.”

“My career has been varied — theater, personal appearances — so I am able to jump around and about,” he says. “Television was a great place to have started and people remember. I am very happy about that.”

But there must be a secret to his longevity.

“I’ve never been a terribly ambitious person,” he says. “I’ve been really lucky that my ‘career’ has come to me, from various ideas and such. The Monkees were very big, generation after generation. So I consider myself lucky. I can still get up on stage and tell my stories.”

 

If you go
Davy Jones

Where: Rrazz Room, Hotel Nikko, 222 Mason St., San Francisco
When: 8 p.m. Friday; 7 and 9:30 p.m. Saturday; 7 p.m. Sunday
Tickets: $45 to $47.50
Contact: (415) 394-1189, www.therrazzroom.com

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