Lisa Stansfield plays in the U.S. for the first time in decades. (Courtesy Ian Devaney/earMUSIC)

Lisa Stansfield plays in the U.S. for the first time in decades. (Courtesy Ian Devaney/earMUSIC)

Dance pop great Lisa Stansfield goes deeper

British dance-pop diva Lisa Stansfield is on her first tour of America in 20 years, playing signature 1980s hits like “All Around the World” and cuts from her latest collection, “Deeper,” co-written with her husband Ian Devaney, who’s been working with her since their first teenage outfit Blue Zone. At her shows, mothers are proudly informing her that their children were conceived with her CDs playing in the background. “It’s been very weird, this ride, because now I’ve got mothers and daughters coming to my concerts and both having a really great time together,” says the campy singer, 52. “I’ve got a young gay following, probably because their moms were really into me. So I’ve got two generations of fans, which is quite weird. And quite wonderful, really.”

You and Ian have been together a long time.

Yeah. It was our 20th wedding anniversary yesterday, and he brought me to New York and we walked through Washington Square Park, where we first got married. But I’m not going to tell you where we ate, because its “our” place and I don’t want anyone to know about it.

But after meeting Ian, you married an Italian designer in 1987, moved to Italy, divorced him four months later, then wed Ian in 1998. Why did it take so long to notice him, romantically?

Well, you always go back to your soul, you know? So I had to go there to come back. But when every cool person in the world is courting you, you don’t realize that they are. My career was happening so quickly, I didn’t realize it at the time, but I wasn’t in love with that man, the Italian. And at 21 years old, you look at the town where you’ve lived all your life, and you think, “Am I ever going to get out of here and do something?” And when you see an opportunity, you do it. I was in love with this guy, but I knew it wouldn’t last. So it was cruel what I did, really. But I was very, very young.

Then 11 years went by …

We couldn’t do anything about it. We did absolutely nothing personal for a long time; we thought it would ruin the musical side of things. But we’ve had such a great ride together, and it’s just lovely to spend time with someone who wants the same things you want. And we do nearly everything together.

What’s the one thing you won’t do?

We never, ever make love with music on. As a musician, it doesn’t add to it — it only distracts.

IF YOU GO
Lisa Stansfield
Where: Fillmore, 1805 Geary Blvd., S.F.
When: 9 p.m. Oct. 26
Tickets: $39 to $117
Contact: (415) 885-0600, www.ticketmaster.com

All Around the WorldDeeperIan DevaneyLisa StansfieldPop Music

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