Corin Tucker goes from rock star to soccer mom

Phoning last week from her kitchen in Portland, Ore., Sleater-Kinney powerhouse Corin Tucker really wanted to start discussing “1,000 Years,” the debut from her brand-new Corin Tucker Band.

But first things first, she said. Her 2-year-old daughter Glory was suddenly demanding lunch at 11 a.m.

“Kids. They kind of eat all morning long, it feels like,” she says, making a sandwich. At 37, she’s even jokingly dubbed her album “a middle-aged mom record,” adding, “because that’s sort of who I am at the moment.”

The singer — who also has a 9-year old son, Marshall — was so preoccupied with family, she had no solid recording plans after Sleater-Kinney amicably disbanded in 2006, and no real desire to tour.

Her gig in The City on Monday is one of only a handful she’s agreed to do for her label Kill Rock Stars, with Glory along for the ride, of course.

However, after penning new material for a 2008 collaboration with Blue Giant and a 2009 benefit concert, she began toying with the idea of returning. Once her producer pal Seth Lorinczi offered her his studio, she said, “We hatched a plan.”

But the former Riot Grrrl has grown up. Her charismatic brassy voice and serrated chords still haunt “1,000 Years,” but she’s softened her approach with acoustic guitar, folksier melodies and lyrics derived from everyday angst, like watching her filmmaker husband Lance Bangs leave on assignment (“Half A World Away,” “It’s Always Summer”).

“On this record, I wanted to do some different things and to have some quieter space that I could tell stories in,” she said. “I don’t really feel like I’ve changed that radically, musically. It’s more like I’ve … branched out. Like my real life has branched out into new territory.”

Having children changed everything. Tucker (who still hasn’t said die on Sleater-Kinney) couldn’t rock out whenever she pleased anymore. So rules were established.

“I insist that the kids go to bed at 8:30, and then I’m done,” said this busy soccer mom. “That’s how I wrote this record. I put the kids in bed and just gave myself at least an hour to write or work on what I needed to get done!”

IF YOU GO

The Corin Tucker Band

Where:
Great American Music Hall, 859 O’Farrell St., San Francisco
When: 8 p.m. Monday
Tickets: $17
Contact:
(415) 885-0750, www.gamhtickets.com

artsentertainmentNEPOther Arts

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