“The Bay” is an eye-catching 40- by-20-foot mosaic mural by Mission-based Precita Eyes Muralists Association. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

“The Bay” is an eye-catching 40- by-20-foot mosaic mural by Mission-based Precita Eyes Muralists Association. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Chase Center’s fine art extravaganza

Sculptures, murals and more in Thrive City

More than 330 art objects, including large sculptures, murals and framed photographs by local and international artists, adorn the new Chase Center and its surrounding Thrive City plaza.

It’s partly the result of a deal between the Golden State Warriors and San Francisco dictating that 1 percent of the site’s construction budget to go toward public art.

The most notable and visible piece to grace the immaculate venue is “Seeing Spheres,” a sculpture by Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson, who was selected by Keehn On Art, a consulting firm hired by the Warriors.

Set outside in east entrance plaza, the sculpture is made of five 15-1/2-foot tall polished hydroformed steel globes, each with mirrors and LED lights, that face each other.

It will be unveiled to the public on Tuesday, along with a discussion panel featuring the artist, Warriors President-CEO Rick Welts and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Janet Bishop.

SFMOMA also has loaned two sculptures to Chase Center: Alexander Calder’s 1963 untitled skeletal installation hangs in the main lobby and Isamu Noguchi’s vivid red undulating “Play Sculpture” is outside the arena.

In addition, the museum commissioned Oakland-based painter David Huffman, who has contributed “Rise,” based on his 2014 painting “Double Jump,” and San Francisco-based Amanda Hughen and Jennifer Starkweather, who are creating a 7-foot-tall, 26-foot-long gold-leaf and blue aluminum mural titled “Between Water and Land.”

And, through the consulting agency Sports & the Arts, which assisted in supplying art for Santa Clara’s Levi’s Stadium, 33 artists are developing visual representations of “the Warriors, entertainment and regional history” with various media.

“The Bay,” a 40- by-20-foot tall mosaic mural by Mission-based Precita Eyes Muralists Association shows two children jumping for a basketball that’s plated in 24-karat gold.

“The Whole Game,” a 10- by 62-foot mural by Chad Hasegawa and Guillaume Ollivier, features familiar imagery of Warriors basketball.

Naming rights partner Chase also is contributing artwork from its JP Morgan Chase Art Collection.

Not all of the art is accessible to public. While Eliasson’s spheres will be on view for any passersby walking along Third Street, some works will be tucked inside the arena’s notoriously expensive private suites .Museums and GalleriesVisual Arts

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Danish artist Olafur Eliasson’s “Seeing Spheres” graces the east plaza at the Golden State Warriors’ Chase Center. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Danish artist Olafur Eliasson’s “Seeing Spheres” graces the east plaza at the Golden State Warriors’ Chase Center. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Chase Center’s fine art extravaganza

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