Celine approaches her final ‘Day’ show

Time is running out to see Celine Dion’s “A New Day” at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas.

Admirers of the vocal superstar may want to note that the show, which opened in March 2003 and has played to some 2 million people, is onstage only through Dec. 15; fewer than 50 performances remain.

“A New Day” is housed in its own nifty 4,000-seat state-of-the-art theater, the “Colosseum,” created specifically the show, which is anything but your typical concert experience. It’s no wonder; the man behind the production is Franco Dragone, best known for his groundbreaking work with Cirque du Soleil.

Many elements of this show display the same combination of ingenuity, surrealism and dazzling technological wizardry seen in Cirque shows. Trees grow, a piano flies in the air, birds flutter, characters float around. They’re cool (though not as cool as other Cirque shows in Vegas, such as “Mystere” or “O”).

Dion is surrounded by hundreds of lights and backed by the world’s largest high-definition LED screen in the world, at 34 feet tall and 109 feet wide. She’s accompanied by 48 dancers who change costumes five times; the singer herself changes six times.

Despite the incredible eye candy, Dion’s internationally renowned voice manages to match the excitement of the scenery, and it really does remain the star of the show.

There’s no denying she can sing. Interestingly, though, the set list of the 90-minute show doesn’t include some of her biggest American hits; she skips “Beauty and the Beast,” “If You Asked Me To” and “That’s the Way It Is,” among others.

She opens with “A New Day Has Come,” then launches into “The Power of Love”; from there, the pace remains constant, even if the fare varies from standards such as “I’ve Got the World On a String” to Stevie Wonder’s “I Wish.”

A French tune, “Pour Que Tu M’aimes Encore,” stands out nicely, while the show’s closing number “My Heart Will Go On” comes as no surprise.

The more concert-like moments when Dion takes a few moments to chat with and thank the audience don’t add much to the show, and that’s disappointing. A lot of the appeal of seeing a performer live comes with feeling a personal connection, and that doesn’t happen here.

Another distancing, somewhat disconcerting factor is that a whole live band doesn’t appear onstage together, and, even with up-to-the-minute sound system, it’s hard to tell exactly where the music’s coming from.

But intimacy is clearly not the goal of “A New Day” — theatricality is. And on that note, Dion and her ample cast and crew come through.

A New Day

Where: Caesar’s Palace, 3570 Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas

When: Aug. 16-19, 22-26 and 29-31; Sept. 1-2, 5-9, 20-23 and 26-30; Oct. 4-7 and 10-14; Nov. 29-30; Dec. 1-2, 5-9 and 12-15

Tickets: $87.50 to $350

Contact: (877) 4-CELINE

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