Band of brothers

The musicians in San Francisco’s Scissors for Lefty are much more than members in a band. The three Garzas (Bryan, Steve and Robby) and two Krimmels (Peter and James) are family — and friends, too.

Having toured together for the past few years, they have found ways to inspire and support each other. On a rare break from constant touring, they recently picnicked with friends, enjoying gourmet sandwiches in Dolores Park.

“We’re on the road more than we’re not on the road … we have very few days to even hang out in The City. This park brings all the nostalgia back. It makes you feel like you’re investing in your own city again,” said lead singer Bryan Garza, who used to live a few blocks away from the park.

On Tuesday, the band released “Underhanded Romance,” a fun, upbeat collection of alternative pop-rock inspired by Bryan’s cityliving experiences.

The group celebrates the CD at The Independent on Friday; its songs, like “Nickels and Dimes,” are dedicated to San Francisco, celebrating street chic, bums who help find parking spaces and budget-minded city dwellers.

Surviving financially is a goal for the group, said Garza. Expenses can be taxing on the pocketbook; the band loses at least $100 each show it plays.

“We are putting our endeavors into spreading the word on our songs and we think we have a lot to offer,” he said. “We’re pretty broke kids, but we have a passion for what we do and we found a way to really enjoy that.

“It’s the culture of enjoying the company of people and sharing ideas and discussing things rather than showing off a $50,000 vehicle. …”

Having opened for the Arctic Monkeys and Dirty Pretty Things, the band wants to continue promoting its music, reaching out to fans in new cities.

While they regularly sell out shows locally, Garza said playing to crowds and scenesters can only do so much — that kind of audience is on the hunt for the next up-and-coming band.

“If you want to reach out to the rest of America, it’s a long endeavor,” he said. “We don’t want to lose sight of that … we try not to get jaded, not act like we’ve done this show or played that town. We could spend our whole lives reaching out to people in a town.”

Scissors for Lefty

Where: The Independent, 628 Divisadero St., San Francisco

When: 9 p.m. Friday

Tickets: $13

Contact: (866) 468-3399 or www.ticketweb.com

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