B-52s founder Cindy Wilson, second from left, released her first solo recording this year. (Courtesy Sean Dunn)

B-52s’ Cindy Wilson finds time for ‘Change’

Time is not only relative to B-52s founder Cindy Wilson, it’s surreal. “The years have just flown by,” says the singer, who released her first solo album “Change” on the hip Kill Rock Stars imprint this year, as her groundbreaking New Wave combo celebrates its 40th anniversary. “It seems like I myself was just 40, but now here I am at 60! But I’m still 13 years old inside, so it’s all good.” There’s a carefree teen insouciance to new material like “No One Can Tell You,” helped in part by younger, tech-savvy collaborators Suny Lyons and Ryan Monahan, who are backing her on tour.

The B-52s are still incredibly busy, doing the winery and shed circuits every summer.

We do every circuit. We’re still going strong, and we do a lot of symphony shows, too, and theaters. We just played this Growlers Festival in L.A., which was a really young market, and it was amazing. We actually had mosh pits! So I’m still so happy that The B-52s can mean so much to people.

And this year, The B-52s got its own line of commemorative Converse Chuck Taylors.

I know! And they’re cute! We’re getting a lot of good merchandise these days, but I think you can only get the Chucks online at our store, or you can come to our shows and get them. So I guess we’ve permeated the American psyche somehow; we’re now part of the American trash aesthetic.

Why wait four decades for “Change”?

It was being in the right place at the right time, and not only having enough time but the right people involved. So everything came together, and we had the luxury of time so we were able to figure out the sound we wanted. But I felt that this material was so strong that it was worth all the energy and attention.

How did the sessions differ from your B-52s work?

In the B-52s we’re more in a performance mode these days, just playing our catalog. And that’s great. But I think it’s really crucial to be creative, so it’s been wonderful to be able to do that again. And it’s been such a stressed-out atmosphere in the United States, doing music has been really helpful for me.

How do you spend the little free time you have?

My husband Keith and I — we met the same night The B-52s played its first party in Athens — still live in Athens, although I’ve got two college-age kids in Atlanta. So my time is usually spent washing clothes, going to see family or taking my elderly uncle for a ride in the country. But my life is pretty hectic right now.

IF YOU GO
Cindy Wilson
Where: Café Du Nord, 2174 Market St. S.F.
When: 7:30 p.m. Dec. 11
Tickets: $20 to $35
Contact: (415) 471-2969, www.eventbrite.com

Just Posted

Free speech group sues city over raids on journalist

Free speech advocates filed a lawsuit Tuesday seeking to force the San… Continue reading

Judge decides to hold Embarcadero attack suspect in jail

Facing new charges, man at center of controversy will not be released ahead of trial

Defense motions for mistrial in Ghost Ship trial denied

Defense lawyers made oral motions on Monday for a mistrial in the… Continue reading

Faced with safety fears in Chinese community, Breed pins blame on Board of Supervisors

San Francisco’s Chinese community is deeply worried about crime, and Mayor London… Continue reading

Scientists finally know how big earthquakes start: with many smaller ones

(LOS ANGELES) The vast majority of earthquakes we feel come soon after… Continue reading

Most Read