Author explores diversity of Bay Area

San Francisco-based writer Rebecca Solnit will be discussing her new book, “Infinite City,” an atlas that uncovers the density of the Bay Area, at the San Francisco Zen Center and Headlands Center on Sunday. 

What is “Infinite City” about? It’s an atlas of San Francisco and the Bay Area that operates from the premise that The City tries to show a coexistence of many different worlds.
What inspired you to create an atlas? I find that most people like maps, and I’m one of them. A proposal from SFMOMA really made me pursue my desire to show the coexistence of natural and human worlds. I’ve been in the Bay Area for almost my whole life, so I wanted to tell people my version of where we are. 
What will you be discussing Sunday? Map 20: “Dharma Wheels and Fish Ladders.” This coexistence of worlds with fish living in the water and humans living on land is a contrast in transcendence of the pure embodiment of life and death that salmon represent. 
What do you hope your readers will gain from “Infinite City”? A richer sense of place — not just of San Francisco, but of every place. It’s called “Infinite City” because it’s infinite not in terms of geographical expansiveness, but in the infinite versions in which it can be interpreted. 

artsbooksLocalRebecca SolnitSan Francisco

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