Getty Images file photoBack on schedule: After recovering from a foot injury this summer

Getty Images file photoBack on schedule: After recovering from a foot injury this summer

At 64, Iggy Pop still the epitome of ‘Raw Power’

It’s a real Renaissance period for veteran punk rocker Iggy Pop.

At 64, he is surfing a tsunami-sized wave of diverse projects that began with the recent rerelease of “Raw Power,” his 1973 classic with his old outfit The Stooges. Reunited, they play a two-night stand in The City starting Sunday (rescheduled after an August foot injury forced the tour’s postponement).

“I got into a position where I could do a few things I wanted to — that was part of it,” he says of this sudden resurgence. “But mainly, it was that other people started thinking of me, and all these invitations — and opportunities that really were opportunities — came up.”

A third Pop biography is out — Brett Callwood’s “The Stooges Head On: A Journey Through the Michigan Underground.”

There’s a new concert DVD, too — “Raw Power Live —In the Hands of the Fans,” and Pop and guitarist James Williamson (who replaced late Stooges axman Ron Asheton in 2009) have been busy composing together.

“Whether it’ll end up being an album or a soundtrack to a documentary or maybe the voice of a new wind-up toy, I don’t know,” he says. “But  there is definitely some new music.”

Non-Stooges-wise, Pop — who was born James Osterberg — recently has appeared in the satiric vampire flick “Suck”; a new Greta Gerwig film, “Art House”; and a voiceover form in Luc Besson’s animated “Arthur 3.”

“I played a retarded mutant monster’s son who everyone is embarrassed by,” he says. “And all Luc wanted me to do was sputter and lisp and grunt for 40 minutes. He flew into Miami and stood right next to me in the studio, saying ‘More spit! More spit!’ ”

Other Pop coups include guesting on Slash’s solo debut, playing a duet with Serge Gainsbourg’s son Lulu, inking a shoe and clothing deal with Vans, translating lyrics for Italian star Zucchero, crooning two Christmas songs on Michel Legrand’s “Noel! Noel!! Noel!!!” album; releasing an arty Michel Houllebecq-inspired recording called “Preliminaires” and appearing on “American Idol,” snarling “Real Wild Child.”

“I certainly was going way outside my comfort zone,” he says of the kinetic cameo. “But after all those years of  hating that piece-of-s— show, I took four minutes and let it be known — here’s how I do it.”

Additionally, Pop does TV commercials for British insurance company Swiftcover. “They were interested in my obvious artistic schizophrenia,” he says. “So they got a puppet to be the hyper me, while I play the at-home me. And while he’s kicking, screaming and cursing, I’m trying to calm him down, saying ‘Let’s read some books! Let’s go to bed early!’

“Because that’s what I’m really like, you know?”

IF YOU GO

Iggy and The Stooges

Where: Warfield, 982 Market St., San Francisco

When: 8 p.m. Sunday and Tuesday

Tickets: $45 to $47

Contact: (888) 929-7849, www.axs.com

artsentertainmentIggy PopmusicPop Music & Jazz

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