Artist uses collage to create depth

Who's in town
Wangechi Mutu:
An artist gives a lecture at the San Francisco Art Institute. In her work, Mutu uses collage as a means of both physically and conceptually creating layered depth. [7:30 p.m., 800 Chestnut St., S.F.]

Lectures
Human rights in Africa:
Speakers discuss human rights and social reconstruction in Africa, with
a focus on Zimbabwe and the Central African Republic. [6 p.m., World Affairs Council, 312 Sutter St., S.F.]

Middle East conflicts: Speakers discuss the hidden stories behind the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and how they affect today’s peace talks. [Noon, Commonwealth Club, 595 Market St., S.F. ]

Josh Frieman: The professor of astronomy and astrophysics gives a talk titled “The Dark Universe and the Origin of Structure.” [7:30 p.m., California Academy of Sciences, Golden Gate Park, S.F.; RSVP: (800) 794-7576]

‘Monday Night Philosophy’: “The Philosophy of Food” is the theme of tonight’s program, which celebrates the holidays. Nutrition consultant Susan J. Machtinger speaks. [6 p.m., Commonwealth Club, 595 Market St., S.F. ]

Literary events
Edmund Morris:
The biographer talks about “Colonel Roosevelt.” [7 p.m., Kepler’s Books and Magazines, 1010 El Camino Real, Menlo Park]

Young Spanish talent: Granta magazine celebrates the writings of young Spanish novelists. Carlos Yushimito, Carlos Labbe and Andres Felipe Solano read from their work. [7:30 p.m., City Lights Bookstore, 261 Columbus Ave., S.F.]

Poetry night: Poets Erik Noonan and Nicholas James Whittington read from their work. An open-mike session follows. [7 p.m., Bird and Beckett Books and Records, 653 Chenery St., S.F.]

Max Fallon: The photographer talks about “Couples: An Eclectic View.” [7 p.m., Books Inc., 2251 Chestnut St., S.F.]

At the colleges
GHS Lecture Series:
UCSF Global Health Sciences presents the lecture “The Crisis in Zimbabwe: Health and Health Care Implications.” [4 p.m., UCSF, Nursing Building, No. 225, 513 Parnassus Ave., S.F.]

At the public library
‘First Monday Movies’:
Program features a screening of “The Long Goodbye,” Robert Altman’s eccentric version of Raymond Chandler’s novel. [6:30 p.m., Excelsior Branch, 4400 Mission St., S.F.]

Parents for Public Schools: Session provides information about enrolling children in a San Francisco public school. [6:30 p.m., Sunset Branch, 1305 18th Ave., S.F.]

Local activities
New documentary:
“Marwencol,” an award-winning documentary film about the fantasy world of an outsider artist, is screening at the Lumiere Theatre. [5 and 7:15 p.m., 1572 California St., S.F.]

Opera singer: Baritone Randal Turner performs a program of arias and opera scenes by living composers. [6 p.m., Swedenborgian Church, 2107 Lyon St., S.F.]

Benefit party: A fundraiser for the 2011 Women on the Way Festival features food, drink, and performances. Guest artists include Jessica Ferris, Leigh Shaw and Pearl Marill. [6 to 9 p.m., Shotwell Studios, 3252-A 19th St., S.F.]

artsGood Day

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