Londoner Jade Bird’s debut EP is called “Something American.” (Courtesy Shervin Lainez)

Londoner Jade Bird’s debut EP is called “Something American.” (Courtesy Shervin Lainez)

American country music inspires Brit Jade Bird

British singer Jade Bird understands that there’s a hickory wind blowing through her debut Glassnote EP titled “Something American,” and its gently jangling single “Cathedral.” But the 20-year-old can’t help herself. As a globe-trotting army brat, she fell in love with American country music, then America itself, when she recorded in an upstate New York studio with The Felice Brothers’ Simone Felice. “It’s a pretty weird connection, I know,” she admits.

How did you get into Nashville sounds over there?

Basically, when I first picked up guitar at 12 or 13, I really got into Neil Young and all that. But then when I was 15, I remember stumbling across The Civil Wars, and I started just re-evaluating everything, really. It was just their songwriting and their chemistry, I think — that’s how I really got into country and Americana. And then I kept on doing my research for a couple of years, just to learn a bit more. I even watched “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” and I was just completely inspired by females in country music and how strong they are. I don’t think people have given those women enough credit for just how strong they really are.

Had you ever been to the U.S. before recording your EP in Rhinebeck?

No. It was the first time, and I was staying right next to Woodstock. And my first impression of America was, “This is unbelievable!” We touched down and I met Simone Felice, and he is just such a spiritually in-tune guy, but also very down to earth. I felt like we really made that connection, which allowed us to work really closely, as well. And I am young, it’s true. But I have worked really hard, and I’m really straightforward, so I felt like we really bonded on that, too. And I’m never too moved by landscape. In my songwriting, I’m more of a people person, more emotional. But the landscapes that I saw in New York were just so incredible and moving. It was fall then, the trees were changing color, and it was literally the most magical place.

What were your biggest U.S. culture shocks?

New York City was very busy, very in your face, and it surprised me that you can feel so isolated in such a crowded city. But L.A. was a big culture shock because you think of it as being so cool, but we went for a drive through the desert and ended up in this ghost town where we didn’t see a soul. We stopped at this desolate gas station, and I must’ve been the first British person this attendant had seen in a very long time.

IF YOU GO

Son Little, with Jade Bird
Where: Chapel, 777 Valencia St., S.F.
When: 8:30 p.m. Nov. 8
Tickets: $15
Contact: (415) 551-5157, www.ticketfly.comCathedralGlassnoteJade BirdPop MusicSomething American

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

San Francisco lacks housing data that would let it track rental vacancies and prices. New legislation is seeking to change that.<ins> (Photo by Joel Angel Jurez/2016 Special to S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Landlords blast proposal to require annual report on rentals as invasion of privacy

Housing inventory could give city better data on housing vacancies, affordability

Health care workers would be the first group in the state to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. (Go Nakamura/Getty Images/TNS)
Hope on the way: Here’s what to know about California’s COVID-19 vaccine plan

The first batch of doses could hit the state as soon as early December

The Big Game was played Friday at Memorial Stadium in Berkeley. (Shutterstock)
Stanford blocks extra point to stun Cal, win 123rd Big Game 24-23

The 123rd edition of the Big Game featured a number of firsts.… Continue reading

Psilocybin magic mushrooms (Shutterstock)
‘Magic mushrooms’ moving into the mainstream

Efforts to decriminalize psychedelics could follow several different paths

The 2020 Census has concluded taking responses sooner than expected. (Courtesy photo)
What does California have to lose if undocumented immigrants are excluded from the census?

By Kim Bojórquez The Sacramento Bee If The U.S. Supreme Court rules… Continue reading

Most Read