A bounty of chamber music from American Bach Soloists

American Bach Soloists’ summer chamber music festival comes to San Francisco next week, with a huge, varied three-program lineup featuring “artistic spotlights,” twilight offerings and “main event” performances.

On Tuesday, the show begins at 6 p.m. with music geared toward families; the 7:15 p.m. performer is Cecilia, a new vocal ensemble. “Baroque Gems” is the spotlight program, featuring works by Albinoni, J.S. Bach, Corelli, Marcello, Telemann and Vivaldi.

Wednesday’s show begins at 6 p.m. with ABS maestro Jeffrey Thomas answering questions about his new book about Handel’s “Messiah.” At twilight, David Daniels Bowes, Adam LaMotte and Robert Howard present salon music; the main event showcases classics by C.P.E. Bach, Haydn and Mozart.

On Thursday at 6 p.m., Steven Lehning, ABS’ principal violone, contrabass and viola da gamba player, will present a “curator’s tour” of priceless string instruments. At 7:15 p.m., the Whole Noyse performs music from 16th- and 17th-century Europe. Romantic music by Beethoven, Mendelssohn and Schubert rounds out the program.

All performances are at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, 1111 O’Farrell St. Tickets are $18 to $37; picnic meals are available for $15 to $18. For details, call (800) 838-3006 or visit www.americanbach.org.

artsentertainmentOther Arts

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

School closures mean more child abuse is going unreported

Advocates seeing more severe incidents as families struggle with stress of staying home

Breed: SF will extend order to stay home until at least May 1

Mayor London Breed said Monday that the shelter-in-place order that went into… Continue reading

A second SF Muni operator tests positive for COVID-19

A second Muni operator has tested positive for COVID-19, the San Francisco… Continue reading

Mental health, suicide hotlines brace for surge of crisis calls

Responders feel the weight of the coronavirus-related calls themselves

Most Read