Senate hopefuls Supervisor Scott Wiener (left) and Supervisor Jane Kim at their separate election parties in San Francisco, Calif. Tuesday, June 7, 2016. (Rachael Garner, Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

Senate hopefuls Supervisor Scott Wiener (left) and Supervisor Jane Kim at their separate election parties in San Francisco, Calif. Tuesday, June 7, 2016. (Rachael Garner, Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

Wiener holding lead in state Senate race with 105,000 ballots left to count

Supervisor Jane Kim has yet to close the five point lead held by her state Senate race opponent, Supervisor Scott Wiener.

That’s the result of the latest ballot count of the San Francisco Department of Elections from Sunday at 4 p.m., which shows Wiener maintaining the same five-percentage point lead over Kim that he’s held since the first results came in.

SEE RELATED: Wiener enjoying ‘nearly insurmountable’ lead against Kim in state Senate race

As the San Francisco Examiner previously reported, this is perhaps the only local race in which the vote rally is still being closely watched. David Latterman, who worked on Wiener’s campaign, said Wednesday of Kim’s vote margin, “It’s a steep climb. It’s not impossible, but it’s steep.”

But since Kim did come from behind in the June primary to win after trailing in the earlier vote tallies, there remains some chance for a repeat pattern.

That lead in San Francisco consists of about 13,000 votes, with 148,097 cast for Wiener and 135,197 cast for Kim. State Senate District 11, which they are running to represent, consists of San Francisco and northern San Mateo County.

The latest tally from San Mateo was not immediately available, but a district wide vote count from the California Secretary of State shows Wiener also leading by 5 percentage points, with 154,030 votes.

The new count comes from an additional 15,619 vote-by-mail ballots, and 67,403 cards, according to the Department of Elections, and there remain about 105,000 ballots left to review, consisting of 81,000 vote by mail ballots and about 24,000 provisional ballots.

“The department expects to continue reviewing and processing vote-by-mail ballots through next week,” the department wrote in a statement.

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