Voters retain mayor’s power to appoint supervisors

San Francisco voters appear to have rejected a measure that would have shaken up city government by stripping the mayor of his power to fill vacancies on the Board of Supervisors.

Proposition D, which required more than 50 percent of the votes to pass, would have required the mayor to appoint a person to temporarily serve as district supervisor — but unlike existing rules, the temporary supervisor wouldn’t have been able to run in the election for the seat.

An election would have been held within months after a vacancy occurs to elect someone for the seat.

Opponents called the measure “unnecessary, wasteful and un-democratic,” and highlighted how the measure will result in special elections, which the City Controller’s Office estimated at $340,000 apiece.

Meanwhile, the Coalition for San Francisco Neighborhoods, a group of neighborhood associations, called it “a wise investment in true democracy.”

Prop. D would have applied to the vacancy created on the board by the winner of the state Senate race.

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