Two incumbents, two newcomers elected to CCSF’s board

San Francisco voters Tuesday elected two incumbents to the governing board of City College of San Francisco as well as two newcomers.

Voters re-elected Board of Trustees President Rafael Mandelman and Trustee Alex Randolph to the CCSF Board of Trustees, alongside former Student Trustee Shanell Williams, and bar owner and progressive activist Tom Temprano.

The new board will have to grapple with a series of financial and enrollment issues at CCSF that emerged after the college’s accreditor first threatened to revoke its accreditation in 2012. While still fully accredited but on restoration status, CCSF has until January to prove it should keep its doors open.

Mandelman, an attorney for the city of Oakland, has led the board through the accreditation crisis as board president and helped it reclaim local control over the college, which it was previously stripped of.

Mandelman said he will prioritize the search for a new chancellor — Interim Chancellor Susan Lamb’s contract expires next June — and also look for private and public funding to sustain the college.

Randolph, a former City Hall legislative aide, also said the chancellor search is imperative. He was appointed to an open seat on the board by Mayor Ed Lee last April before beating Temprano in the race for the seat in November 2014.

Randolph is interested in increasing transparency at the college and accreditation reform across the state.

Williams, a community engagement specialist for UC San Francisco, has been an activist calling to keep CCSF open and accredited since 2012. As a trustee, Williams said she would work to boost student enrollment and pay for faculty and staff.

Temprano, the owner of Virgil’s Sea Room, said improving enrollment is central for CCSF to move forward and believes CCSF should spend more of its large funding reserves on student outreach.

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