Spending against District 11 candidate Kimberly Alvarenga reaches $1.1M

Spending against District 11 candidate Kimberly Alvarenga reaches $1.1M

Money continued to pour into San Francisco’s supervisor races ahead of the polls closing Tuesday.

On Monday, District 1 candidate Sandra Lee Fewer faced the most money against her, totaling $1.06 million. That’s based on total third-party spending combined with the most money raised of an opposing candidate, in this case apparent fellow frontrunner Marjan Philhour.

SEE RELATED: SF’s million dollar supervisor races

Meanwhile, in District 11, progressive frontrunner Kimberly Alvarenga as of Monday was facing $1.05 million being spent against her from her moderate challenger Ahsha Safai, and third-party spending benefiting Safai in excess of $700,000.

But on Tuesday, that amount of spending increased by $50,000 against Alvarenga, bringing the total spending against her to $1.1 million, the most facing any candidate in all six Board of Supervisors contests.

“I feel in the bottom of my heart that money doesn’t buy elections all the time,” Alvarenga told the San Francisco Examiner on Monday. “Corporate interests have tried to buy elections in San Francisco for a while now.”

But she pointed to certain contests where they tried and failed, such as Supervisor Eric Mar’s re-election bid in 2012 and most recently in November 2015 when Supervisor Aaron Peskin defeated his opponent, mayoral appointee and tech-backed Julie Christensen.

“Now they are trying here in District 11,” Alvarenga said Monday.

Third-party spending in support of Safai has totaled $753,770, which includes money from tech and real estate interests. Spending against Safai totaled $440,000 Tuesday.

Third-party spending benefiting Alvarenga totaled $207,587, which included funding from tenant groups and SEIU 1021.

2016-election-bug_

 

Spending against District 11 candidate Kimberly Alvarenga reaches $1.1M

Just Posted

The Hotel Whitcomb on Market Street was one of many hotels that took in homeless people as part of The City’s shelter-in-place hotel program during the pandemic.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Closing hotels could disconnect hundreds from critical health care services

‘That baseline of humanity and dignity goes a long way’

Pachama, a Bay Area startup, is using technology to study forests and harness the carbon-consuming power of trees. (Courtesy Agustina Perretta/Pachama)
Golden Gate Park visitors may take a survey about options regarding private car access on John F. Kennedy Drive, which has been the subject of controversy during the pandemic.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Your chance to weigh in: Should JFK remain closed to cars?

Host of mobility improvements for Golden Gate Park proposed

Dreamforce returned to San Francisco in person this week – but with a tiny sliver of past attendance. (Courtesy Salesforce)
Dreamforce returns with hundreds on hand, down from 170,000 in the past

High hopes for a larger Salesforce conference shriveled during the summer

“Radiant Fugitives” by Nawaaz Ahmed is a poignant family tragedy. (Courtesy photo)
“Radiant Fugitives” by Nawaaz Ahmed is a poignant family tragedy. (Courtesy photo)
‘Radiant Fugitives’ explores ties that bind, and divide, a Muslim family

Nawaaz Ahmed’s SF-set novel links personal, political conflicts with passion, empathy

Most Read