No new oversight for SF housing as Proposition M fails

San Francisco will likely not create a new commission to oversee the Department of Economic and Workforce Development and the Department of Housing and Community Development after voters appear to have rejected Proposition M on Tuesday.

Prop. M, which required more than 50 percent of the votes to pass, would have created the Housing and Development Commission to specifically to oversee the two departments. The measure was considered one of the recent efforts to chip away at the mayor’s power.

The economic and workforce development department monitors programs that coordinate with private workforce development, job training and other business projects; while the housing and community development department provides financing for purchasing, rehabilitating and development affordable housing in The City, as well as other below-market-rate housing efforts.

The mayor appoints the leaders of both departments and can remove them as well. Advocates of the measure had said creating a commission to oversee the departments will increase transparency.

The commission would have been comprised of seven members: three appointed by the mayor, three by the Board of Supervisors and one by the City Controller.

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