( Ryan McNulty/Special to SF Examiner)

( Ryan McNulty/Special to SF Examiner)

Early reaction: SF politicians weigh in on Donald Trump

Politicians at the local and state level are speaking out about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s success in the polls as Election Day surges into the night.

SEE RELATED: Complete SF Examiner election coverage

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee was unfazed by Trump’s strong showing.

“California will still be California,” Lee said. “San Francisco will be a beacon.”

Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom called Trump’s rise “a national disgrace” and said that California’s values “are in absolute conflict with Donald Trump.”

Supervisor Jane Kim, a District 11 state Senate candidate, said San Francisco will need continue fighting whether a Republican or Democrat is in the White House.

“It just means that in a city as progressive as San Francisco, that we’re going to have to continue to fight locally,” Kim said of a possible Trump win. “We’ll continue to do that with a Republican or Democrat in the White House.”

She added, “Sanctuary city is going to be a big concern. Funding for public schools is going to be a big concern. Funding for affordable housing is going to be a big concern.”

Marjan Philhour, one of two front-runner candidates to represent District 1 on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, also weighed in on the matter.

“All I can say is I’m worried, I’m disappointed and concerned,” Philhour said. “We have our differences at the local level… but this, I have no words… It’s all of it, not just his sexist tendencies but misogyny. It’s not just threat of war. For me, as a woman running for office and as a mother, it is a really unsettling feeling.”

Hillary Ronen, a District 9 supervisor candidate, said, “It’s not over. I’m concerned, but it’s not over.”

District 1 Supervisor Eric Mar said Trump’s success is a reflection of the country.

“What a shocker. I guess theres a lot of closet bigotry in our culture,” Mar said. “It makes it so much more important what we do here.”

Daly City Mayor Sal Torres, whose constituency has large Filipino and Latino immigrant populations, said Trump’s message is about division.

“It just makes our work harder,” Torres said. “We, as people of immigrant backgrounds, we need to stand up and educate our people and our communities that we’re all the same. We all have the same needs.”

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