CCSF parcel tax extended by voters

San Francisco voters extended a parcel tax Tuesday, securing raises for City College of San Francisco employees and helping the college retain its class schedule ahead of a $35 million fiscal cliff next school year.

With Proposition B, CCSF’s Board of Trustees asked local voters to increase and extend a parcel tax for the college that voters first approved in 2012, and was set to expire in 2020.

The increase — from $79 to $99 per parcel a year — will ensure the college can pay faculty the raise it agreed to under a long-awaited consensus the two sides reached over summer, as well as wage hikes for classified staff.

None of the $19 million a year that the Controller’s Office estimates the parcel tax will generate will be used to pay administrators.

The hike will also help the college keep its libraries open and maintain its class schedules, which administrators expect to cut by 5 percent a school year for six years even with Prop. B passing.

The early renewal of the parcel tax is meant to show the college is fiscally sound, with a stable source of locally controlled funding for the next 15 years.

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