A dock can be seen next to Hyde St. Pier in San Francisco, Calif. Monday, November 13, 2017. (Daniel Kim/Special to S.F. Examiner)

UPDATE: Aquatic Park closes to swimmers after second sea lion attack reported in SF Bay in as many days

UPDATE 10:15 A.M.:

The National Park Service is closing San Francisco’s Aquatic Park to swimmers after a second sea lion attack on a swimmer was reported in the San Francisco Bay in as many days Friday morning.

UPDATE 9 A.M.:

A second sea lion attack on a swimmer was reported in the San Francisco Bay in as many days Friday morning, fire officials said.

The incident Friday occurred around 9 a.m. at Aquatic Park, according to fire officials.

One man with non-life threatening injuries was taken to a local trauma center. Further details about that attack were not immediately available.

On Thursday, a seal or sea lion bit another swimmer on his upper right arm this afternoon shortly before 2 p.m. as he swam outside of Aquatic Park, according
to police.

Officer Matthew Reiter with the San Francisco Police Department’s Marine Unit said the solo male swimmer was brought to police by a sailboat that reported a swimmer in distress.

He was bleeding badly from the bite wound, and police applied a tourniquet and pressure to stop the bleeding before transferring him to paramedics for transport to a hospital.

“He told us that he was swimming when a sea lion came up to him,” Reiter said. “He said he splashed water at it, he yelled at it when that didn’t work, the sea lion came up to bite him and he used his arm to push it away.”

Reiter said such attacks were uncommon, and he had not seen one before during his time with the marine unit.

Dr. Claire Simeon, a veterinarian with the Marine Mammal Center, published a study with the University of California at San Francisco in 2015 looking at sea lion and seal bites and scratches.

She said researchers talking to the members of two San Francisco swim clubs found only 11 such incidents over a period of three years, and one of those had actually taken place in Washington.

The study found no clear patterns or common causes among the incidents. While it was clear that approaching the animals could cause negative reactions, many of the swimmers did not appear to have done anything to provoke the attack.

“As these animals are wild, their behavior can be erratic,” Simeon said.

Experts recommend that swimmers and beach goers try to maintain a safe distance from seals and sea lions, as they have sharp teeth and a strong bite.

“I don’t think that people should be afraid to go into the water,” Simeon said. “We’re lucky to be able to share our coastline with these amazing animals.”

“We really want people to leave seals be and enjoy the bay,”
Simeon said.

Bay City News Service contributed to this report.

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