Students evacuate George Washington High School in San Francisco's Richmond District Friday, May 20, 2016 after the school was placed on lockdown following a bomb threat. (Ekevara Kitpowson/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Students evacuate George Washington High School in San Francisco's Richmond District Friday, May 20, 2016 after the school was placed on lockdown following a bomb threat. (Ekevara Kitpowson/Special to S.F. Examiner)

UPDATE: Lockdown lifted at SFUSD schools following bomb threat

UPDATE 1 P.M.: Students were released from Washington High School on Friday afternoon hours after a man called the school and reported a bomb was on campus, district officials said.

Students left the school, located at 599 30th Ave., at 12:30 p.m., the time the school was set to let out because of final exams this week.

Two nearby schools, Lafayette Elementary and Presidio Middle schools, were locked down for several hours as well, but the lockdown was lifted around 1:30 p.m.

Police have been speaking continuously with the man who allegedly called in the bomb threat, said San Francisco police spokesperson Officer Grace Gatpandan.

Officers have been canvassing Washington High with K-9 units and nothing suspicious had been found as of 1 p.m.

“There’s no immediate threat,” Superintendent Richard Carranza told reporters outside district offices Friday afternoon.

Students evacuate George Washington High School in San Francisco's Richmond District Friday, May 20, 2016 after the school was placed on lockdown following a bomb threat. (Ekevara Kitpowson/Special to S.F. Examiner)
Students evacuate George Washington High School in San Francisco’s Richmond District Friday, May 20, 2016 after the school was placed on lockdown following a bomb threat. (Ekevara Kitpowsong/Special to S.F. Examiner)

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