Residents told to stay indoors due to ‘large’ fuel spill in Noe Valley

A large fuel spill from a big-rig in San Francisco’s Noe Valley neighborhood has prompted The City’s Department of Emergency Management to urge anyone in the immediate area to stay inside.

The fuel spill was reported at 12:12 p.m. near the intersection of 28th and Noe streets, according to San Francisco fire spokeswoman Mindy Talmadge.

Talmadge said the big-rig, which remains parked at the top of the hill, was spilling diesel fuel into the street. The fuel was running from the truck, down the hill, and into a storm drain.

Fire crews are working to lay absorbent material on the street to prevent any more fuel from running into the sewer system.

Talmadge said crews are siphoning gasoline out of the truck’s fuel tanks and that The City’s Department of Public Works has been called to the intersection to handle fuel that ended up in the sewer.

The spill was reported by a third party, who apparently didn’t see a responsible party with the truck as fuel spilled into the road, according to Talmadge.

Talmadge said police are investigating the incident and are working to determine who is responsible for the truck.

Just Posted

A large crack winds its way up a sidewalk along China Basin Street in Mission Bay on Friday, Sept. 24, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
San Francisco’s sinking sidewalks: Is climate change to blame?

‘In the last couple months, it’s been a noticeable change’

City Attorney Dennis Herrera in 2019. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
City Attorney Herrera OK’d as new SFPUC head

Appointment likely to bring further changes to City Hall

For years, Facebook employees have identified serious harms and proposed potential fixes. CEO Mark Zuckerberg, pictured in 2019, and COO Sheryl Sandberg have rejected the remedies, causing whisteblowers to multiply. (Eric Thayer/New York Times)
Facebook’s problems at the top: Social media giant is not listening to whistleblowers

Whistleblowers multiply, but Zuckerberg and Sandberg don’t heed their warnings

Auditory hallucinations are typically associated with psychosis, schizophrenia or a manic phase of bipolar disorder. Yet for some patients who have started hearing voices during the pandemic, none of those diagnoses apply. <ins>(Shutterstock)</ins>
Pandemic-related loneliness is leading to hallucinations for some

Bay Area women experiencing similar distress to those in jail

Between 2012-2018, The City lost 186 beds in residential care facilities for the elderly that serve under 15 people, according to city reports. (Courtesy RAMS Inc.)
Decline of assisted living facilities impacts S.F.’s aging homeless population

‘We need a much more aggressive strategy to provide beds for people’

Most Read