Reports of human waste, needles surge on SF streets

San Francisco streets may be cleaner this year, but citizens are more frequently reporting their confrontations with pieces of feces and needles on city streets and sidewalks.

That’s according to researchers from the San Francisco Controller’s Office, who determined in a report released last Tuesday that while there was less litter and grime on city streets in 2015-16 than the year prior, public reports of feces and hypodermic needles significantly increased.

The feces reports appear to have reared in the greatest quantities in neighborhoods like Hayes Valley and along parts of Market Street.

Reports of human waste increased city wide by 39 percent from 2014-15 to last year, according to the report, while 13.5 percent resulted in service orders for the Department of Public Works.

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The Controller’s Office also recorded more instances of street feces.

Evaluators encountered about the same number of instances of feces, needles and condoms — which they call FNC — on commercial streets in San Francisco, but a little bit more of the health hazards on residential streets.

Feces, needles and condoms were just one of the street conditions that the Controller’s Office looked into. The report also examined heightened graffiti, a sudden uptick in reports of broken glass and increases in illegal dumping in some areas of San Francisco, for instance.

The report can be viewed here.

 

Human waste reports in The City (Courtesy San Francisco Controller's Office).

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