Elderly man dies from carbon monoxide poisoning at Bernal Heights home

An elderly man who died of apparent carbon monoxide poisoning at a home in San Francisco’s Bernal Heights neighborhood early Thursday morning has been identified by the Medical Examiner’s Office as 78-year-old Even Lammers.

Lammers, a San Francisco resident, was found in the downstairs unit at 301 Moultrie St. after firefighters responded to a report of a carbon monoxide alarm going off in the upper unit shortly before 4:30 a.m., according to Fire Department spokesperson Lt. Jonathan Baxter.

Firefighters arrived and found four people and low levels of carbon monoxide in the upper unit, then noticed there was a lower unit and knocked on the door there after hearing a television on inside, Baxter said.

After no one responded, firefighters forced entry and found an elderly woman unconscious inside. She was taken to Saint Francis Memorial Hospital, which has a hyperbaric chamber specifically meant for carbon monoxide cases, according to Baxter.

Crews continued to search the lower unit and found an elderly man, later identified as Lammers, also unconscious. Life-saving measures were unsuccessful and he was pronounced dead at the scene, Baxter said.

An elderly resident from the upper unit also ended up hospitalized after not feeling well, according to Baxter.

PG&E crews responded to examine appliances for a possible source of the carbon monoxide leak. Baxter said the most likely source is a water heater on the lower level.

Both units had carbon monoxide detectors that were working and sounded alarms, he said.

Fire officials encourage residents who hear a carbon monoxide detector alarm to immediately evacuate their home and then call 911.

Baxter said the fact that the residents in the upper unit called authorities right away might have ended up saving the life of the elderly woman in the lower unit.

Anyone with concerns about whether an appliance is safe from carbon monoxide poisoning or whether a carbon monoxide detector is working properly can call PG&E at (800) 743-5000 for free inspections.

Editor’s note: This story has been updated with additional information.

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

After the pandemic hit, Twin Peaks Boulevard was closed to vehicle traffic, a situation lauded by open space advocates. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
New proposal to partially reopen Twin Peaks to vehicles pleases no one

Neighbors say closure brought crime into residential streets, while advocates seek more open space

Members of the Sheriff’s Department command staff wear masks at a swearing-in ceremony for Assistant Sheriff Tanzanika Carter. One attendee later tested positive. (Courtesy SFSD)
Sheriff sees increase in COVID-19 cases as 3 captains test positive

Command staff among 10 infected members in past week

Lowell High School is considered an academically elite public school. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Students denounce ‘rampant, unchecked racism’ at Lowell after slurs flood anti-racism lesson

A lesson on anti-racism at Lowell High School on Wednesday was bombarded… Continue reading

Golden State Warriors forward Draymond Green (23), shown here against the San Antonio Spurs at Chase Center on January 20, was ejected from Thursday night’s game on a technical foul after he yelled at a teammate during a play. (Chris Victorio for the S.F. Examiner).
Warriors 119-101 loss to Knicks highlights Draymond Green’s value

Team struggles with fouls, lack of discipline in play

Scooter companies have expanded their distribution in neighborhoods such as the Richmond and Sunset districts. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFMTA board signs off on changes to scooter permit program

Companies will gete longer permits, but higher stakes

Most Read