Robyn Purchia

In San Francisco, many compostable containers, cups and cutlery are brought to the landfill. (Courtesy photo)

Compostable containers don’t end up where you think they do

For years, San Franciscans have used compostable plastic containers, cups and cutlery because it’s supposed to be the better environmental choice.

In San Francisco, many compostable containers, cups and cutlery are brought to the landfill. (Courtesy photo)
“I hate using plastic,” said Jay Hamada, the owner of JapaCurry. (Courtesy photo)

Is reuseable ware in the future of takeout food?

A new business will offer restaurants and food trucks reusable stainless steel containers to replace disposable foodware starting in October.

“I hate using plastic,” said Jay Hamada, the owner of JapaCurry. (Courtesy photo)
On September 18, the San Francisco Bay Area Women’s Environmental Network (WEN) is hosting a hackathon to bring women together to deconstruct traditional male-dominated solutions to environmental problems.                                Courtesy photo

Hacking male-dominated environmental solutions

Numerous studies have highlighted differences between male and female responses to climate change.

On September 18, the San Francisco Bay Area Women’s Environmental Network (WEN) is hosting a hackathon to bring women together to deconstruct traditional male-dominated solutions to environmental problems.                                Courtesy photo
Federal officials with the U. S. Department of the Interior approved a plan to deliver more water to Central Valley farms, while suppressing a report that found water diversions would further threaten salmon. (Courtesy photo)

The Trump administration blow to wild salmon

The ESA’s successes could be even greater if it wasn’t repeatedly stymied by a small group of special interests.

Federal officials with the U. S. Department of the Interior approved a plan to deliver more water to Central Valley farms, while suppressing a report that found water diversions would further threaten salmon. (Courtesy photo)
“We have to give them something,” a man selling produce told me when I asked why he continues to provide free plastic bags. (Courtesy photo)

Green Space: Stop using banned items

Government regulations can only go so far; especially, when the bans aren’t paired with enforcement.

“We have to give them something,” a man selling produce told me when I asked why he continues to provide free plastic bags. (Courtesy photo)
PG & E appears to be making The City jump through unnecessary and expensive hoops. (Courtesy photo)

PG&E is holding up energy improvements in San Francisco

SFUSD’s goal may be difficult to achieve while PG&E still owns the distribution network.

PG & E appears to be making The City jump through unnecessary and expensive hoops. (Courtesy photo)
Yes, others should follow SFO’s lead, but not only because the plastic bottle is bad. (Courtesy photo)

Banning plastic water bottles at SFO is only a first step

We should also be talking about the water inside.

Yes, others should follow SFO’s lead, but not only because the plastic bottle is bad. (Courtesy photo)
Last month, the Port of San Francisco released its Draft Waterfront Plan. (Courtesy photo)

Researchers set out to map San Francisco’s past

Researchers plan to virtually re-construct the ecology and hydrology of San Francisco pre-European contact

Last month, the Port of San Francisco released its Draft Waterfront Plan. (Courtesy photo)
(Courtesy photo)

The booms and busts in the population of anchovies

California anchovies are almost exclusively sold abroad as food for fish farms and bait for tuna.

(Courtesy photo)
Consumers need more information and resources to reduce food waste. (Courtesy Ends + Stems/Sophi Pechner Photography)

Meal planning can help reduce food waste

More data, research needed to help city, residents make more efficient use of resources

Consumers need more information and resources to reduce food waste. (Courtesy Ends + Stems/Sophi Pechner Photography)
Zabble, a company that uses mobile technology to simplify waste audits, track and monitor waste, and improve efficiency, is one business that is benefiting from The City’s Zero Waste goals. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

As summer starts, San Francisco’s job market is heating up.

City’s zero waste efforts produce jobs

Zabble, a company that uses mobile technology to simplify waste audits, track and monitor waste, and improve efficiency, is one business that is benefiting from The City’s Zero Waste goals. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
cutline ls dlskd ks jkd ks jdks kd ks jks jkd jsk ksjks jks jsk kjsk sjks jk jsk sksksk jsj dk sj dkjs. (Courtesy photo)                                If Cole Valley residents had been less vigilant, a Verizon wireless antenna would be up at the corner of Belvedere and Grattan streets. (Courtesy photo)

Don’t rubberstamp Verizon wireless antenna proposal

Last week’s hearing at the San Francisco Board of Appeals was reminiscent of the mythical battle between David and Goliath.

cutline ls dlskd ks jkd ks jdks kd ks jks jkd jsk ksjks jks jsk kjsk sjks jk jsk sksksk jsj dk sj dkjs. (Courtesy photo)                                If Cole Valley residents had been less vigilant, a Verizon wireless antenna would be up at the corner of Belvedere and Grattan streets. (Courtesy photo)
Trees are necessary for S.F.’s future as climate change worsens and heat rises.

Trees are necessary for San Francisco’s future

Earlier this week, San Franciscans had the rare opportunity to leave their light sweaters at home and take their shorts out for a spin.

Trees are necessary for S.F.’s future as climate change worsens and heat rises.
Concepts like climate change are not too complex or scary for children to understand. (Courtesy photo)

Today’s kids are working to save the planet

Room 205b at Grattan Elementary School in Ashbury Heights looks like the classrooms I sat in as a kid.

Concepts like climate change are not too complex or scary for children to understand. (Courtesy photo)
A Danish study questions whether reusable totes are more environmentally friendly than plastic bags. (Courtesy photo)

Which is better: Plastic bag or cotton tote?

Although San Francisco and California have both banned plastic bags, many city stores continue to make the contraband item available.

A Danish study questions whether reusable totes are more environmentally friendly than plastic bags. (Courtesy photo)
For restaurants, reuseable foodware may be less costly than using throwaways. (Courtesy photo)

How about a ‘real’ napkin with that pizza?

Chowing down on slices at Presidio Pizza on Divisadero and Pine streets can occasionally get messy.

For restaurants, reuseable foodware may be less costly than using throwaways. (Courtesy photo)
Since its restoration in 2005, Thompson Reach near Crissy Field has become a butterfly “hotspot.” (Courtesy/Presidio Trust)

How to get off the path toward mass extinction

The same day that another dead gray whale was found on Ocean Beach last week, news that onemillion plant and animal species are on the verge of extinction made international headlines.

Since its restoration in 2005, Thompson Reach near Crissy Field has become a butterfly “hotspot.” (Courtesy/Presidio Trust)
“Smart” technology helps San Franciscans stay connected, can improve efficiency and keep us safer. But that doesn’t mean a new wireless facility directly outside a home is necessary or appropriate. (Courtesy photo)

Plan for wireless antenna draws neighborhood opposition

Neighbors in Lower Pacific Heights are banding together to fight a small project on Baker and Pine streets.

“Smart” technology helps San Franciscans stay connected, can improve efficiency and keep us safer. But that doesn’t mean a new wireless facility directly outside a home is necessary or appropriate. (Courtesy photo)
Only approximately 1 percent of all U.S. farmland is certified organic. (Courtesy photo)

Regenerative funds invest in environmental health

Recently, researchers at the UC San Francisco and Berkeley compared pesticide levels in the bodies of American families.

Only approximately 1 percent of all U.S. farmland is certified organic. (Courtesy photo)
More needs to be done to address the many global environmental crises the world is facing. (Courtesy photo)

A public bank is good for the planet

The days around Earth Day are always full of environmental announcements.

More needs to be done to address the many global environmental crises the world is facing. (Courtesy photo)