Robyn Purchia

While health officials say COVID-19 isn’t spread through the use of bulk foods and reusable containers, there continues to be a reliance on wasteful disposables. (Shutterstock)

Bulk shopping is back, and that’s a good thing

Self-service is safe, but sustainability still elusive during pandemic

While health officials say COVID-19 isn’t spread through the use of bulk foods and reusable containers, there continues to be a reliance on wasteful disposables. (Shutterstock)
A drop in salmon in the Tuolumne River in 2020 is cause for concern.<ins> (Shutterstock)</ins>

Salmon dwindling while SFPUC fiddling

Decreasing numbers in Tuolumne demand science-based solutions

A drop in salmon in the Tuolumne River in 2020 is cause for concern.<ins> (Shutterstock)</ins>
Zero Grocery is among the Bay Area organizations delivering groceries in plastic-free packaging. (Screenshot)

Bye Trump, hello hope: SF can show US what’s possible

City’s climate efforts will shine under new administration

Zero Grocery is among the Bay Area organizations delivering groceries in plastic-free packaging. (Screenshot)
Residents of Treasure Island report serious health concerns that may be associated with the area’s toxic environment.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>

The safety of Treasure Island residents must be addressed

SF needs to step up to improve health of low-income dwellers

Residents of Treasure Island report serious health concerns that may be associated with the area’s toxic environment.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
The Presidio Trust, which has restored natural areas in The City, is considering reintroducing the locally extinct California quail to the urban park.<ins> (Shutterstock)</ins>

Presidio may bring California quail back to San Francisco

Residents can create conditions that would allow charismatic bird to thrive

The Presidio Trust, which has restored natural areas in The City, is considering reintroducing the locally extinct California quail to the urban park.<ins> (Shutterstock)</ins>
Sea turtles and other marine wildlife, sadly, are eating plastic bottles. (Courtesy Rich Carey/Shutterstock)

As plastic pollution wreaks havoc, should SF think bigger?

Newly elected Supervisor Connie Chan is ready to take on plastic industry

Sea turtles and other marine wildlife, sadly, are eating plastic bottles. (Courtesy Rich Carey/Shutterstock)
Hetch Hetchy in Yosemite, which supplies water to San Francisco, is among the concerns of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, which is undergoing a change of leadership. <ins>(Courtesy SFPUC)</ins>

Changes in leadership at SFPUC spark concern, hope for future water policy

Will agency’s new commissioner continue to support Big Ag?

Hetch Hetchy in Yosemite, which supplies water to San Francisco, is among the concerns of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, which is undergoing a change of leadership. <ins>(Courtesy SFPUC)</ins>
Clockwise, from top left, Manny Yekutiel and candidates Jon Ossoff and Rev. Raphael Warnock appeared in a virtual event dedicated to electing green Democrats to Georgia’s seats in the U.S. Senate. (Screenshot)

A green Georgia on our minds

San Franciscans can mobilize to help elect Democrats Warnock, Ossoff to Senate

Clockwise, from top left, Manny Yekutiel and candidates Jon Ossoff and Rev. Raphael Warnock appeared in a virtual event dedicated to electing green Democrats to Georgia’s seats in the U.S. Senate. (Screenshot)
Tenderloin residents are finding benefits to having roads closed in the neighborhood. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>

Should there be fewer cars in the Tenderloin’s future?

The pandemic has opened San Franciscans’ eyes to new uses of urban streets

Tenderloin residents are finding benefits to having roads closed in the neighborhood. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Environmentalists are studying how the breakdown of a green mineral called olivine positively affects carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.<ins> (Shutterstock photo)</ins>

Let’s keep the climate restoration movement growing

Innovators’ and policymakers’ efforts to restore balance should be encouraged

Environmentalists are studying how the breakdown of a green mineral called olivine positively affects carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.<ins> (Shutterstock photo)</ins>
Many San Francisco residents – including parents whose kids are spending a lot of time in front of screens — are eagerly anticipating the reopening of The City’s playgrounds, including Helen Diller playground. (Samantha Laurey/Special to S.F Examiner)

Looking forward to the reopening of The City’s playgrounds

SF kids deserve the opportunity to get outside

Many San Francisco residents – including parents whose kids are spending a lot of time in front of screens — are eagerly anticipating the reopening of The City’s playgrounds, including Helen Diller playground. (Samantha Laurey/Special to S.F Examiner)
Harper Fortgang, a student at Proof School in San Francisco, is a member of the award-winning Team Super Plants, which is growing California native plants with “supercharged” roots that fight climate change. (Courtesy Michael Yetman)

Green Space: Middle-school students attack climate change with ‘Super Plants’

SF team wins Cousteau-sponsored challenge with biodiversity project

Harper Fortgang, a student at Proof School in San Francisco, is a member of the award-winning Team Super Plants, which is growing California native plants with “supercharged” roots that fight climate change. (Courtesy Michael Yetman)
Bayview and Hunters Point residents and advocates are calling for city officials to help clean up their neighborhood. (Courtesy Robyn Purchia)

Green Space: Seeking environmental justice in the Bayview

Residents who can’t breathe demand cleanup, reconsideration of India Basin project

Bayview and Hunters Point residents and advocates are calling for city officials to help clean up their neighborhood. (Courtesy Robyn Purchia)
San Francisco could be taking steps to encourage people to drink good tap water from hydration stations safely during the pandemic. (Kevin S. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Green Space: The many benefits of free, tasty tap water

SF should fund safe use of hydration stations

San Francisco could be taking steps to encourage people to drink good tap water from hydration stations safely during the pandemic. (Kevin S. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Andy Goldsworthy’s sculpture “Spire” in the Presidio is among the treasures in San Francisco parks, which benefit from private funding in addition to tax dollars. (Courtesy photo)

Green Space: Pitch in to protect a city park

Enjoy – and support — S.F.’s open spaces

Andy Goldsworthy’s sculpture “Spire” in the Presidio is among the treasures in San Francisco parks, which benefit from private funding in addition to tax dollars. (Courtesy photo)
Successfully restored, San Francisco’s Crissy Field today is a wildlife habitat and natural spot that visitors and residents enjoy. (Courtesy photo)

Green Space: AB 3030 a good step toward improving natural resources

Law has support among scientists and environmentists, but some industries fear burdensome restrictions

Successfully restored, San Francisco’s Crissy Field today is a wildlife habitat and natural spot that visitors and residents enjoy. (Courtesy photo)
”I’m hearing about a large uptick in the amount of plastic bags and disposable foodware on the beaches,” said Eben Schwartz, outreach manager for the California Coastal Commission. (Courtesy photo)

Green Space: Stop trashing San Francisco

The pandemic has increased the use of single-use bags and take-out containers throughout The City

”I’m hearing about a large uptick in the amount of plastic bags and disposable foodware on the beaches,” said Eben Schwartz, outreach manager for the California Coastal Commission. (Courtesy photo)
Air monitoring equipment sits in a field below a development at Hunters Point Shipyard, where concerns linger about radioactive contamination.                                Kevin N. Hume/ 
S.F. Examiner

Green Space: Environmental groups fight for racial justice

Environmental justice activists have long fought some of these systemic acts of racial violence that are often less reported in the news

Air monitoring equipment sits in a field below a development at Hunters Point Shipyard, where concerns linger about radioactive contamination.                                Kevin N. Hume/ 
S.F. Examiner
Advocates say San Francisco agencies need to increase tree planting in The City as well as ensure that trees aren’t unnecessarily removed. Courtesy photo)

Green Space: Stop taking trees down

Growing SF’s urban canopy provides economic, environmental benefits

Advocates say San Francisco agencies need to increase tree planting in The City as well as ensure that trees aren’t unnecessarily removed. Courtesy photo)
A $1.8 million settlement between the San Francisco Herring Association and PG&E provided funding for a permit retirement program to help assure the urban herring fishery survives for future generations.(Courtesy photo)

Green Space: Saving the future of the herring fishery

“We’re not in the business to catch the last fish,” said Nick Sohrakoff, president and director of the San Francisco Bay Herring Research Association

A $1.8 million settlement between the San Francisco Herring Association and PG&E provided funding for a permit retirement program to help assure the urban herring fishery survives for future generations.(Courtesy photo)