Term limits are far from dead. Here's where to start getting them in Congress

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Term limits ceased to be a practical political possibility when the 1994 Republican congressional majority failed to fulfill their Contract with America promise on the issue, right?

Wrong on both counts. The GOP Congress did vote on the issue, but the vote was rigged to insure that no concrete progress was achieved. And term limits, which continue to enjoy massive public support in 2010, CAN become a reality despite the previous setback.

Paul Jacob,who was a key leader of 1994 term limits campaign has posted an important Common Sense column suggesting that the incoming House Republican majority could take major steps on the issue right now.

“Having regained the majority, some Republicans are mumbling about 'granting exceptions' to committee chair limits for this guy and that guy and the other guy. But rampant exceptions to sensible reforms would show that nothing much is changing in how Congress does business. And a lot’s got to change,” Jacob said.

“Other Republicans, though, are talking about term limits not only for committee chairmen but for all leadership positions. The new Majority Leader-to-be, Eric Cantor, tells The Hill he’d support 'a six-year term limit for each position.'”

He also points to a constitutional amendment introduced by Sen. Tom Coburn, R-OK, that would allow senators to serve no more than two six-year terms and representatives no more than three two-year terms.

You can read Jacob's full column here.  For more on the Coburn amendment, go here.

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