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SF approves massive Pier 70 housing, office development

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A major development on Pier 70 was approved Tuesday. (Rendering courtesy Forest City)
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San Francisco approved Tuesday a major housing and office space development on the central waterfront’s Pier 70.

The development agreement between the Port of San Francisco, The City and developer Forest City calls for up to 1.75 million square feet of commercial office space, and up to 445,000 square feet of retail, light industrial and arts space as well as more than a thousand new homes.

“The plans reflect what the community wants in a great new waterfront neighborhood. The project fulfills promises to rehabilitate historic buildings, add parks, build significant affordable housing, and create space for artists, local manufacturing and commercial uses,” Jack Sylvan, Forest City senior vice president, said in a statement following the vote.

Forest City will build on 28 acres of the total project site between 1,100 to 2,150 new residential units with at least 30 percent of the homes affordable to low- and moderate-income households. Across the full 35-acre project site the development calls for between 1,645 and 3,025 residential units.

The project was 10 years in the making and included voter approval in 2014 under Proposition F, which required a vote if development would exceed existing height limits along the waterfront.

The project building heights will range from 50 feet to 90 feet, in excess of the existing 40 foot height limit.

Supervisor Malia Cohen, who represents the area of Pier 70, called the vote a “momentous time.”

“After a decade of extensive public process, we are moving forward a vision to reintegrate and restore a 28-acre site into the fabric of San Francisco while creating an active and sustainable neighborhood that recognizes its industrial past,” Cohen said in a statement. “In addition to the over $750 million of public benefits, this project will bring access and connection to a piece of the waterfront that has never been accessible, and for that we should be incredibly proud.”

The public benefits include the restoration of three historic building structures — parcels 2, 12 and 21 — that played a significant role in the history of steel shipbuilding on the West Coast.

The development will take 11 years to complete.

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