Sessions declines to recuse himself from probe into Trump lawyer

WASHINGTON — Attorney General Jeff Sessions has decided against recusing himself from the investigation into President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, but will consider stepping back from specific questions tied to the probe, according to a person familiar with the matter.

By contrast, Sessions recused himself from the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election that’s now led by special counsel Robert Mueller, a decision that angered Trump and left Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in charge of the inquiry.

Sessions, who was a top adviser to Trump’s presidential campaign, announced in March 2017 that he had decided he should steer clear of “any matters arising from the campaigns” for president. Trump has called Sessions weak for doing so and said he never would have named him as attorney general had he known the recusal would follow.

By staying involved in the Cohen probe, Sessions is entitled to briefings on the status of the investigation, which is being conducted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office of the Southern District of New York. That could put Sessions in the position of being asked by Trump, who strongly condemned the FBI raid on his longtime lawyer, to divulge information about the Cohen investigation.

Sessions could also weigh in on specific decisions by prosecutors, including whether to pursue subpoenas and indictments. The attorney general may be asked about his role in the Cohen investigation when he testifies before congressional panels on Wednesday and Thursday.

The investigation into Cohen’s finances and past work was opened based in part on a referral from Mueller.

The Justice Department declined to comment specifically about decisions on recusal in the Cohen investigation, saying only that Sessions follows appropriate procedures.

“The attorney general considers his potential recusal on a matter-by-matter basis as may be needed,” the department said in a statement. “To the extent a matter comes to the attention of his office that may warrant consideration of recusal, the attorney general would review the issue and consult with the appropriate Department ethics experts.”

But Geoffrey Berman, the U.S. attorney in the Southern District of New York, has recused himself from the Cohen probe, according to a U.S. official. It’s unclear what triggered his recusal.

Rosenstein, as the No. 2 official at the Justice Department, is responsible for coordinating and resolving any conflicts between the Mueller probe and the Cohen investigation.

In a sign of how senior Justice Department officials can become involved in investigative matters, Rosenstein approved an FBI raid earlier this month on Cohen’s home, office and hotel room that seized a trove of information.

Trump denounced the raid as “an attack on what we all stand for” and repeated that it was a “terrible mistake” for Sessions to recuse himself from the Mueller probe.

The absence of a full recusal from the Cohen investigation means that Sessions can weigh in on certain matters related to the investigation that reach Justice Department headquarters, said Stanley Twardy, a former U.S. attorney for Connecticut who’s now a white-collar criminal defense lawyer at the law firm Day Pitney LLP.

There are no hard rules governing when Sessions would need to step aside, and decisions will depend on the specific issues at hand, Twardy said. “It’s a question of what Sessions has decided to do,” Twardy said.

However, there are multiple layers protecting the integrity of the Cohen investigation, Twardy said. For example, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York is fiercely independent and composed of career prosecutors Trump can’t fire. The Cohen probe is being overseen by Robert Khuzami, Berman’s deputy and a former Securities and Exchange Commission enforcement director.

The FBI is also involved in the investigation, and there’s a grand jury that can make independent decisions — all of which help insulate the probe from any political interference, Twardy said.

Tribune News Service
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