Proposition 30 too close to call 

click to enlarge The financial future of California schools was up in the air as Proposition 30 was too close to call late Tuesday. - AP FILE PHOTO
  • AP file photo
  • The financial future of California schools was up in the air as Proposition 30 was too close to call late Tuesday.

A roundup of how California propositions were doing as of midnight in Tuesday's election:

Propositions 30, 38: UNDECIDED, FAIL

It was unclear late Tuesday night whether Proposition 30 would pass. The measure would raise California’s sales tax to 7.5 percent from 7.25 percent and create four new high-income brackets for taxpayers making $250,000 or more over the next seven years. A competing measure, Proposition 38, was going down to defeat. It would have increased income taxes for most state residents in order to draw $10 billion more in revenue annually for 12 years, and it would have earmarked most of the new funds for school districts and early childhood development programs.

Proposition 31: FAIL

STATE BUDGET This measure, which would have established a two-year cycle for state budgets and prohibited legislators from creating expenditures of more than $25 million without equal cuts, failed.

Proposition 32: UNDECIDED

POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS The proposed ban on corporate and union contributions to state and local candidates fell behind in early results Tuesday in a close race.

Proposition 33: UNDECIDED

 

AUTO INSURANCE California drivers will have to wait longer to know for sure whether they can pursue car insurance discounts based on coverage longevity, as the results of Proposition 33 were too close to call Tuesday. Under the proposal, if drivers can prove they were covered by any licensed insurer over the previous five years, the “persistency discounts” would apply.

Proposition 34: UNDECIDED

DEATH PENALTY The death penalty may remain a sentencing option for criminal prosecutors, but the measure to remand the death sentence to life without the possibility of parole dropped behind in early results Tuesday. The new policy would apply retroactively to inmates on death row. Since California voters decided to reinstate the death penalty in 1978, more than 700 inmates have been placed on death row — a figure trailing only Texas and Florida. Only 13 California inmates have been executed since that time.

Proposition 35: PASS

HUMAN TRAFFICKING Voters approved a measure that will increase prison terms for human traffickers and require convicted sex traffickers to register as sex offenders. Prop. 35 also will require criminal fines on convicts to pay for services for victims and mandated training on the issue for law enforcement officers.

Proposition 36: PASS

THREE-STRIKES REFORM The state’s three-strikes law requiring a life sentence for three felony convictions was modified, voters decided Tuesday. Proposition 36 will change the policy so that a third strike must be a “serious or violent” felony to require a life sentence. The new policy will authorize re-sentencing for third-strike inmates whose offenses were not serious or violent.

Proposition 37: FAIL

GMO LABELING The measure to label foods containing genetically modified material was struck down by voters. Prop. 37 would have also prohibited such foods from being labeled or advertised as “natural” and provided an exemption for foods that are certified organic, unintentionally contain genetically engineered material, or are made from animals fed by genetically altered material but not genetically altered themselves.

Proposition 39: PASS

BUSINESS TAX FOR ENERGY A measure to more heavily tax out-of-state businesses was approved Tuesday by voters. Prop. 39, which is designed to generate up to $1 billion in additional revenue, will require those businesses to calculate their percentage of sales in California instead of being exempt from those taxes by not locating facilities in the state.

Proposition 40: PASS

 

REDISTRICTING A referendum on the most recent once-per-decade California Senate redistricting plan passed after ballots were counted Tuesday. The Citizens Redistricting Commission’s maps, which were called inadequate by critics of the state’s attempts to take politics out of the process, will remain unchanged.

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