Outraged by Citizens United decision, Public Citizen calls for amendment to limit freedom of speech 

Folks at Public Citizen, the Ralph Nader group that has supported litigation to limit freedom of speech through campaign finance laws, are so outraged by today's Citizens United Supreme Court decision that they are calling for a constitutional amendment to limit freedom of speech.

In their statement responding to the decision, Public Citizen's leaders demanded public financing of congressional elections, then added their call for an amendment, saying:

"Public Citizen will aggressively work in support of a constitutional amendment specifying that for-profit corporations are not entitled to First Amendment protections, except for freedom of the press. We do not lightly call for a constitutional amendment. But today’s decision so imperils our democratic well-being, and so severely distorts the rightful purpose of the First Amendment, that a constitutional corrective is demanded.

"We are formulating language for possible amendments, asking members of the public to sign a petition to affirm their support for the idea of constitutional change, and planning to convene leading thinkers in the areas of constitutional law and corporate accountability to begin a series of in-depth conversations about winning a constitutional amendment."

In other words, since we lost under the current rules, we're going to try to persuade enough people out there in America to change the rules to make it clear we win.

At least they are finally admitting that they view the First Amendment - which says Congress shall make no law respecting freedom of speech - as flawed. And that they judge themselves as smarter than James Madison, the author of the Bill of Rights that begins with the First Amendment (actually it was the third, but that's another story), and the "Father of the Constitution."

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Mark Tapscott

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