Occupy SF meets with Mayor Ed Lee's office 

click to enlarge Occupy SF members asked an official with Mayor Ed Lee's office if Lee would draft a resolution supporting the protesters' cause. (Examiner file photo) - OCCUPY SF MEMBERS ASKED AN OFFICIAL WITH MAYOR ED LEE'S OFFICE IF LEE WOULD DRAFT A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING THE PROTESTERS' CAUSE. (EXAMINER FILE PHOTO)
  • Occupy SF members asked an official with Mayor Ed Lee's office if Lee would draft a resolution supporting the protesters' cause. (Examiner file photo)
  • Occupy SF members asked an official with Mayor Ed Lee's office if Lee would draft a resolution supporting the protesters' cause. (Examiner file photo)

Occupy SF demonstrators met with a representative of Mayor Ed Lee’s office Thursday, but what exactly they hoped to gain from it was unclear.

It was no surprise that by the end, little was accomplished.

“We just want to know what they’re thinking,” said Zack Helwa, a participant in Occupy SF’s activities, which have been building steam since starting in The City on Sept. 17.

Because the movement makes decisions by consensus, no one member speaks for the group. But a tweet from its Twitter account said members were at City Hall to determine potential spaces that could be offered for semi-permanent camps.

Police and Department of Public Works officials cleared out materials in the group’s camp outside the Federal Reserve Bank on Market Street just after midnight Oct. 6. Demonstrators have since still been sleeping there — minus the tents and cooking equipment, which The City took issue with when the campers didn’t obtain required permits.

Christine Falvey, a spokeswoman for the Mayor’s Office, said the prospect of stable camp locations “was never on the table.”

One meeting attendee asked Paul Henderson, the mayor’s deputy chief of staff on public safety, if Lee would draft a resolution supporting Occupy SF’s cause. Henderson said while he doesn’t speak for the mayor directly, he highly doubted a resolution will be drafted. He said without a clear message from Occupy SF, the mayor wouldn’t know what to support.

While the message of the group varies, it centers on combating income disparity and the influence of financial institutions on politics. After the camp was broken up Oct. 6, the mayor issued a statement saying he sympathizes with the movement, but sidewalks should not be blocked.

dschreiber@sfexaminer.com

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Dan Schreiber

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