NTSB eyes lack of landing tool in Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crash 

click to enlarge Asiana Flight 214
  • AP Photo/NTSB
  • This photo provided by the National Transportation Security Board (NTSB), shows the flight data recorder, left, and cockpit voice recorder, right of the Asiana Airlines flight 214 that crashed at the San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, Saturday, July 6, 2013, in Washington on Sunday, July 7, 2013. The Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 crashed while landing after a likely 10-hour-plus flight from Seoul, South Korea. The flight originated in Shanghai and stopped in Seoul before the long trek to San Francisco.

An aviation safety official says accident investigators are looking into what role the shutdown of a key navigational aid may have played in the San Francisco plane crash.

National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Deborah Hersman says the glide slope -- a ground-based aid that helps pilots stay on course while landing -- had been shut down since June.

She says pilots were sent a notice warning that the glide slope wasn't available.

Hersman tells CBS' "Face the Nation" that there were many other navigation tools available to help pilots land. She says investigators will be "taking a look at it all."

The Asiana Airlines plane crashed as it was about to land Saturday, breaking off its tail and catching fire.

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