Muni honors San Francisco man who defended bus during World Series riots 

click to enlarge Transit avenger: Simon Timony, right, says San Francisco’s transit system, including the torched Muni bus he tried to save, deserves our respect. - COURTESY PHOTO
  • Courtesy Photo
  • Transit avenger: Simon Timony, right, says San Francisco’s transit system, including the torched Muni bus he tried to save, deserves our respect.

With his wounds now healed, Simon Timony — the 28-year-old San Francisco resident who was beaten up after attempting to stop a mob from wrecking a Muni bus after the Giants’ World Series triumph last week — was able to add a little levity to the ugly scene.

“A wise man once said, ‘Hey, you shouldn’t get between a group of people trying to attack a Muni bus,’” Timony recalled during a Muni meeting Tuesday. “I said, ‘Watch me.’”

Timony received a recognition of commendation from Muni on Tuesday for his efforts to protect a $700,000 bus from being torched on Market Street on Oct. 28. Timony stepped in front of rioters smashing up the bus and urged them to stop. He was punched and kicked by the mob, which broke his nose and two teeth in the process.

However, his actions did not go unnoticed. After hearing reports about the attack, Supervisor Scott Wiener invited Timony to share his VIP section for the Giants’ World Series parade at Civic Center. Muni followed with its recognition award, although Timony elected to turn down any future perks from the transit agency’s board of directors.

“I thank the board for the free-Muni-for-life offer,” Timony said with a smile, “but I must respectfully decline.”

The Police Department reported 36 arrests from the riots that broke out after the Giants captured their second World Series title in three years with a sweep of the Detroit Tigers. Gregory Tyler Graniss, 22, was charged with felony vandalism after he was photographed using a police barricade to smash up the windshield of an  8X-Bayshore Express bus — the same vehicle that Timony was trying to step in and save.

“We have the greatest transportation of any city in the country and it should be treated as such,” Timony said. “When in danger, it should be defended.”

Operator Alan Yam also was honored Tuesday by Muni. Yam was driving the 8X bus at the time of the incident, and his calming actions helped prevent any injuries to the passengers aboard the bus.

wreisman@sfexaminer.com

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Will Reisman

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