CCSF chancellor confirms school will seek restoration status 

click to enlarge City College of San Francisco has applied for restoration status, which would give the school two more years to come into compliance with accrediting standards. - BETH LABERGE/2012 S.F. EXAMINER FILE PHOTO
  • BETH LABERGE/2012 S.F. EXAMINER FILE PHOTO
  • City College of San Francisco has applied for restoration status, which would give the school two more years to come into compliance with accrediting standards.

City College of San Francisco has applied for restoration status, despite having "serious reservations" about the move, CCSF Chancellor Art Tyler said Monday.

The policy allowing this was recently created by the commission that voted to revoke the school's accreditation last summer.

Restoration status gives CCSF two more years to come into compliance with accrediting standards and is the only remaining administrative option for the school to continue its accreditation beyond Thursday, the revocation deadline set last summer by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges.

However, the school remains open and accredited going into the fall semester.

Tyler confirmed the school's decision to apply for restoration status in a letter dated Monday to Barbara Beno, ACCJC's president.

But Tyler also emphasized a number of concerns clouding the policy, such as language that requires CCSF to "fully meet all accreditation standards and commission policies" that could mean any deviation from compliance would prompt the school to lose its accreditation.

Tyler also pointed out that the commission would be authorized to "reactivate" the termination of CCSF's accreditation without an opportunity for the school to request a review or appeal.

ACCJC offered restoration status in June after school leaders told the commission that they need at least 18 more months to reach full compliance.

Restoration differs from candidacy status, which the commission had previously urged CCSF to seek, and would have required CCSF to withdraw its accreditation -- a move Tyler refused. With restoration status, however, the school remains accredited.

Tim Killikelly, president of CCSF's faculty union American Federation of Teachers Local 2121, said restoration status raises more questions than it answers.

"There is no guarantee that we will be in restoration status," Killikelly said. "If we are denied to be in that status, according to the rules, the college will be terminated."

In January, however, a judge barred ACCJC from taking any action on accreditation until a lawsuit filed by The City is resolved. It's slated to go to trial in October.

About The Author

Laura Dudnick

Bio:
Laura Dudnick, a Bay Area native, covers education, health and other topics for The San Francisco Examiner. She previously worked as a senior local editor for Patch.com, and as the San Mateo County bureau reporter and weekend editor for Bay City News Service.
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