Bayview housing may welcome families by ’14 

click to enlarge Future vision: The Bayview-Hunters Point housing development is expected to include 320 acres of parks and open space, as well as commercial space. - COURTESY RENDERING
  • COURTESY RENDERING
  • Future vision: The Bayview-Hunters Point housing development is expected to include 320 acres of parks and open space, as well as commercial space.

A portion of the long-planned and long-delayed housing development in the Bayview-Hunters Point shipyard area could open to families by 2014, the developer said Thursday.

Construction on the hilltop area in Hunters Point overlooking the shipyard — the initial phase of the massive 702-acre project — is expected to begin later this year, Lennar Urban President Kofi Bonner said. If all goes as planned, families could begin moving into some 300 to 400 homes about 18 months later, Bonner said.

The development on the site of the former naval base and at Candlestick Point, which was approved by The City in 2010, calls for 10,500 residential units, including a rebuild of the Alice Griffith housing project. It also is set to create 320 acres of public parks and open space, along with commercial space.

Bonner estimated the full project would take 20 years and cost $8.5 billion.

Significant time has been devoted to cleaning up the toxic shipyard site, where the Navy stored radioactive materials; negotiating with the 49ers over a possible new stadium; and planning aimed at balancing affordable housing needs with commercial development. The approval process was marked by contentious public meetings with wary residents of the neglected neighborhoods.

“But for this community and their commitment, Lennar would probably have left this city,” Bonner told a group of community leaders and city officials at a City Hall ceremony marking the developer’s $7.3 million payment toward affordable housing and job training in the Bayview.

Lennar Corp. has agreed to a total of $37.5 million for programs that community leaders hope will stem the outflow of poor black families from San Francisco.

Mayor Ed Lee said the Bayview development was one of many “old promises” The City intended to
follow through on.

The Lennar money will be disbursed by The San Francisco Foundation, an independent public foundation specializing in affordable housing and workforce development, in “a very accountable, a very transparent process,” foundation CEO Dr. Sandra Hernandez said. She said that could include small-business development and buying foreclosed homes to lease them back affordably to Bayview families.

aburack@sfexaminer.com

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