BART protests in San Francisco lose steam 

click to enlarge Intimate gathering: The man sitting on a bike, right, outside the Civic Center station Monday evening was one of three people who showed up for the weekly BART protest. He left after 15 minutes. (Mike Koozmin/The Examiner) - INTIMATE GATHERING: THE MAN SITTING ON A BIKE, RIGHT, OUTSIDE THE CIVIC CENTER STATION MONDAY EVENING WAS ONE OF THREE PEOPLE WHO SHOWED UP FOR THE WEEKLY BART PROTEST. HE LEFT AFTER 15 MINUTES. (MIKE KOOZMIN/THE EXAMINER)
  • Intimate gathering: The man sitting on a bike, right, outside the Civic Center station Monday evening was one of three people who showed up for the weekly BART protest. He left after 15 minutes. (Mike Koozmin/The Examiner)
  • Intimate gathering: The man sitting on a bike, right, outside the Civic Center station Monday evening was one of three people who showed up for the weekly BART protest. He left after 15 minutes. (Mike Koozmin/The Examiner)

All things must come to an end — including BART protests.

The seventh consecutive planned demonstration called by the online hacker group Anonymous officially fizzled Monday when only three protesters came to the UN Plaza and Civic Center station.

Barbara Bettenburg, 61, of San Francisco was one of the three. She held a sign that read, “Stand down BART police.” Another protester left after 15 minutes.

Bettenburg said police brutality is worthy of outrage.

“It’s still an issue,” she said.

Over the past few weeks, the number of demonstrators has dwindled. At its peak, more than 100 people marched up and down Market Street, forcing San Francisco police to close the thoroughfare and BART to shut the four downtown stations.

The protest would have been the seventh consecutive Monday demonstration since BART police fatally shot transient Charles Hill at the Civic Center station July 3. Another two were called by the community group No Justice, No BART.

Demonstrations have targeted police brutality, specifically the shootings of Hill and Oscar Grant III on New Year’s Day 2009. Anonymous became involved when BART decided to shut down cellphone service to deter a protest in mid-July.

As many as 40 people have been arrested during the course of the demonstrations.

Last week, protesters took a different turn when nearly a dozen boarded trains and silently handed out literature detailing their grievances.

Many said they would be out in force week after week until the BART police force is disbanded and the agency’s chief spokesman, Linton Johnson, and police chief, Kenton Rainey, are fired. None of the demands have been met.

Meanwhile, Assemblyman Tom Ammiano is hosting an oversight hearing Tuesday on the BART police force. The meeting is at 10 a.m. at the Capitol in Sacramento.

akoskey@sfexaminer.com

Pin It
Favorite

More by Andrea Koskey

Comments (3)

Showing 1-3 of 3

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-3 of 3

Add a comment

Videos

© 2014 The San Francisco Examiner

Website powered by Foundation