• Issue Archive for  
  • Aug 8-9, 2008
Digital Edition

News

  • Robert Downey Jr. is movin’ on up

    The rise, fall and subsequent resurrection of Robert Downey Jr. have been documented to the point of tedium. By now, the derogatory labels once attached to a young star whose drug addiction led him first to rehab and later to prison seem more and more like footnotes to a career marked by critical and commercial successes.

  • Gasoline habits lower prices

    Bay Area consumers are cutting down on gas consumption — and it’s driving down gas prices, analysts say.

    At the end of the week, the average price for one gallon of unleaded gasoline in San Francisco was down 16 cents from one month ago at $4.34, said Matt Skryja, spokesman for AAA of Northern California. The national average is also down.

  • Cover Story: The helmsman

    The redevelopment of Hunters Point Shipyard and Treasure Island is heavy with The City’s hopes and fears about its future. So heavy, in fact, that life must be perpetually breathed back into the projects, just to keep them from falling over dead of their own weight.

Sports

Arts

  • At Home: Gurbaksh Chahal

    Everyone calls him “G.”

    At just 26, Gurbaksh Chahal already has created and sold two Internet companies, one to Yahoo for $300 million.

    He’s currently represented by the William Morris Agency, and will star in December in “The Secret Millionaire” on Fox.

  • Travel: Puttin' on the newfangled Ritz at Dana Point

    As a first-time visitor to the Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel, my only association with the resort is its predominance as a wedding destination in “Town & Country.” For good reason: who wouldn’t want to plan their nuptials atop a 150-foot ocean-facing bluff that overlooks Dana Point, one of the most ideal places to surf in Southern California.

Opinion

  • Bright Light of the Week: Lopez Lomong

    What: The track athlete was the flag bearer for the U.S. Olympic team during the opening ceremony of the Beijing Games. What makes the occasion even more special is that Lomong is one of the Lost Boys of Sudan. When he was 6, he was separated from his parents at gunpoint and made his way to a refugee camp in Kenya.

© 2014 The San Francisco Examiner

Website powered by Foundation